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lectures Past Lectures & Literary Events

2014

Darkness & Light Symposium

Saturday, February 22, 2 – 5:30 pm
Free

The Artist at WorkAn afternoon symposium with Nordic museum directors, curators, and artists in conversation about the state of contemporary photography in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Participants include Elina Heikka, Finnish Museum of Photography; María Karen Sigurdardóttir, Reykjavík Museum of Photography; Ingrid Nilsson, Preus Museum, Norway; Anna Tellgren, Moderna Museet, Sweden; and several Darkness & Light artists.

2:05 pmWelcome | Edward P. Gallagher, President, The American-Scandinavian Foundation
2:10 pmDarkness & Light Introduction | Anna Tellgren, Moderna Museet, Stockholm
2:30 pmNordic Photography – A Complementary Story | Elina Heikka, The Finnish Museum of Photography
3 pmBreak/Coffee
3:30 pmArtist Panel | Thora Dolven Balke, Tonje Bøe Birkeland, Bára Kristinsdóttir, Tova Mozard, and Pétur Thomsen with moderators Ingrid Nilsson, Preus Museum and María Karen Sigurdardóttir, Reykjavík Museum of Photography
4:30 pmQ & A
5 pm Screening | Tova Mozard, The Big Scene, 2012. Video, 32 minutes

See also Darkness & Light: Contemporary Nordic Photography in EXHIBITIONS section.

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Exhibitions Off-Site Zorn Exhibition Lectures

Off-Site Zorn Exhibition LecturesCo-sponsored by the ASF with The National Academy Museum, in conjunction with the exhibition Anders Zorn: Sweden’s Master Painter, on view at The National Academy Museum – February 27 through May 18, 2014
Lectures held at The National Academy Museum – 1083 5th Avenue (@ 89th Street), NYC

Anders Zorn: Sweden’s Master Painter
Lecture by Dr. Johan Cederlund, Director, The Zorn Museum

Wednesday, February 26, 5 pm
Free, but RSVP required to rsvp@nationalacademy.org or 212.369.4880 ext. 201

Anders Zorn (1860-1920) is one of Sweden’s most accomplished and beloved artists. Born in humble circumstances in a small village of Mora, Dalarna, he quickly rose to become an international portrait painter of the highest order. Notable Europeans and Americans of the day, celebrities, kings, queens, as well as U.S. presidents were among his subjects. His enduring popular acclaim, however, is based on his nude paintings, genre scenes, and pictures of water. Like many of the old masters, Zorn was a versatile artist: a painter in oils and watercolors and etcher, drawer, sculptor, and designer. Zorn was capable of everything and any technique. He depicted just what he saw and did so with apparent ease.

About Johan Cederlund

Johan Cederlund holds a Ph.D. in art history from Lund University and was the curator of Uppsala University’s art collections 2000-06. Since 2006 he has served as director of The Zorn Museum in Mora. He is an Adjunct Professor at Uppsala University.

Cederlund has written various books about Swedish art and architecture, e.g. Classical Swedish Architecture and Interiors 1650-1840, (Norton, New York, 2007) and Zorn Masterpieces (Mora, 2010).

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Emma Lamm Zorn: Philanthropist, Ethnographer, Woman, and Jew
Lecture by Dr. Michelle Facos, Indiana University

Wednesday, March 26, 6:30 pm
Free, but RSVP required to rsvp@nationalacademy.org or 212.369.4880 ext. 201

Emma Lamm Zorn was one of Sweden’s most energetic promoters of social equality and regional identity in her adopted province of Dalarna. The wife of Anders Zorn, she played an instrumental role in establishing Sweden’s first regional open-air museum, an orphanage, a community college dedicated to handicrafts, and in assembling an impressive collection of textiles, silver, and folk and fine art. While Anders spent extended periods away from his home town of Mora and died in 1920, Emma was busy at work administering, instigating, and organizing until her death in 1942. While the marriage of a peasant’s illegitimate artist-son to the daughter of a prosperous Stockholm merchant was an unusual alliance at the time, both spouses profited from the singular opportunities it presented.

About Michelle Facos

Michelle Facos is Professor of the History of Art at Indiana University, Bloomington. She is an internationally-recognized expert on Swedish painting and has taught Scandinavian art at Växjö University and Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University in Greifswald, Germany. A contributor to the Luminous Modernism catalogue, her book Nationalism and the Nordic Imagination: Swedish Art of the 1890s (1998) investigates Swedish nature, nationalism, and art in the years around 1900, and her books Symbolist Art in Context (2009) and An Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art (2011) incorporate Scandinavian art into mainstream European movements.

Zorn, Paris, and the International Avant-Garde
Lecture by Dr. Thor J. Mednick, University of Toledo

Wednesday, April 16, 6:30 pm
Free, but RSVP required to rsvp@nationalacademy.org or 212.369.4880 ext. 201

Anders Zorn was arguably the most internationally successful of all the Scandinavian painters working in the 1890s. In his effort to make a place for himself as a Scandinavian modernist, Zorn fashioned a style that was at once internationally relevant and regionally peculiar. With particular attention to Zorn’s extended sojourns in Paris and the United States, the works he produced in these years, and the cultural luminaries he encountered and worked with, this talk will contextualize Zorn in the general emergence of Scandinavian art into the mainstream and evaluate his significance for this phenomenon.

About Dr. Thor J. Mednick

Dr. Thor J. Mednick, former Fellow of the ASF and the Ambassador John L. Loeb Jr. Foundation, is Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Toledo. A recognized scholar of 19th-century art and an expert on turn-of-the-century art in Denmark, he has published on Peder Severin Krøyer and the artists’ colony in Skagen, Denmark, and is currently preparing a publication on the work of Vilhelm Hammershøi.

Mednick earned a Ph.D. in 2009 from Indiana University, Bloomington, School of Fine Arts, Department of the History of Art, specializing in the areas of 19th- and 20th-century European Art, with minors in African art, as well as European and American History. In 2003, he also earned an M.A. in Art History/Museum Studies, with a Museum Studies Certificate, form the University of Southern California, Art History Department. Prior to that, in 1993, Mednick earned a B.F.A in Screenwriting from the University of Southern California, School of Cinema/Television. In spring 2003, he also studied at the University of Copenhagen, Institute of Fine Arts, taking written examinations in Modern Danish Art.

He is an internationally recognized expert with a solid record of publications, presentations, exhibitions, awards, fellowships and numerous works in progress.

A proven instructor in a variety of settings since 2003, Dr. Mednick has been affiliated since 2010 with Missouri Southern State University (MSSU), in Joplin, as a non-tenure stream Assistant Professor of Art. He was Visiting Scholar for the University of Copenhagen's Department of Art and Cultural Studies in 2009 – 2010 and for the Scandinavian Section at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2008 – 2009. He served as Visiting Lecturer, from 2006 to 2009 at the University of Copenhagen, and in 2005 at the Visual Arts and Media Studies Division at Pasadena City College.

At Indiana University, he was Instructor of Record in fall 2004 and spring 2005 as well as Teaching Assistant in fall 2003 and spring 2004. Between 2000 and 2003, he was also employed in a number of curatorial positions, including at the National Gallery of Art in Copenhagen; the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, California; and the Fisher Gallery at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles.

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Do Everything – Break Stereotypes When Choosing Educational Work

Thursday, March 13, 3 – 5 pm
Free, but RSVP required. Please RSVP to unmission@mfa.is by Tuesday, March 11, 2014

U.N. agencies, governments, academia, and civil society have increasingly in recent years stressed the need to fight obstacles for gender equality in education and work life. This seminar addresses the range of different challenges and obstacles that still remain in the Nordic countries for gender equality within education and work life. The main focus will be on the fact that choices of young people are still very gender divided at all levels of education. Experts in the field of social and educational research will discuss challenges and possible measures to influence changes in gender-segregated work life and education.

A networking reception to follow the program.

Panelists include:

Opening remarks by Mr. Dagfinn Høybråten
Secretary General of the Nordic Council of Ministers

Ms. Helga Aune
Postdoctoral research fellow, Ph.D – Department of Public and International Law, University of Oslo, Norway

Ms. Nanna Højlund
Vice President of Women’s Council in Denmark and Union official in Trade and Labour, Denmark

Ms. Berglind Rós Magnúsdóttir
Lecturer / Assisant Professor, School of Education, University of Iceland, Iceland

Ms. Miriam Nordfors
Political Adviser, Sweden

Ms. Sara Sundell
Gender Equality Adviser, Folkhälsan (Social and Health Care Organisation), Finland

Moderator: Ms. Rósa Guðrún Erlingsdóttir
Special Adviser, Department of Social and Labour Market Affairs, Ministry of Welfare, Iceland

For more information, visit www.norden.org/CSW

The Expert Seminar has been arranged by the Nordic Council of Ministers.

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Artist Talk with photographer Thora Dolven Balke

Tuesday, April 8, 6:30 pm
Free

Artist Talk with Photographer Thora Dolven BalkePhotographer Thora Dolven Balke discusses her artistic practice and the new works created for Darkness & Light: Contemporary Nordic Photography.

About the artist

Thora Dolven Balke (b. 1982) has exhibited extensively in Norway and internationally. In 2008 she was part of Lights On – norsk samtidskunst at the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art. Her work was later part of The Collectors as part of the 2009 Venice Biennial. She was one of two curators of the Lofoten International Art Festival in 2011 and co-funded and programmed the artist-run space REKORD in Oslo from 2006 to 2010. She is currently a resident at the International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP) in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Babette’s Feast 2.0
PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature

Tuesday, April 29, 7 pm

For the first of PEN World Voices' three curated readings in a dinner setting, gather at the New York epicenter of Nordic culture, the beloved Scandinavia House, to inaugurate this reading-dinner pairing. Travel to Nordic heaven – right in the heart of Manhattan – and break bread with audience and artists alike, including Tomas Bannerhed, A.M. Homes, Steinunn Sigurdardottir, and Bob Holman.

Babette's Feast 2.0: PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature
About the participants

Tomas Bannerhed, born in 1966, grew up in Uråsa village in the province of Småland in southern Sweden, and now lives in Stockholm. His professional background includes being a university teacher and a magazine editor. In 2011 his debut novel The Ravens/Korparna was awarded the prestigious Swedish August Prize (Book of the Year) and has since received several other prizes. Foreign rights have been sold to seven countries, including the U.K., France, and Germany. The U.K. edition will be published by Clerkenwell Press in spring 2014.

Born in Reykjavík, Steinunn Sigurðardóttir made a name for herself at the age of nineteen with a volume of poetry entitled Continuances/Sifellur (1969). Sigurðardóttir has since become one of Iceland’s most frequently translated writers, and one of its most lauded, having won the Icelandic Literature Prize for Place of the Heart/Hjartastaður (1995) and the national Bookseller’s Prize in 2011, among others. Sigurðardóttir’s extensive body of work includes eleven novels, seven volumes of poetry, two volumes of short stories, radio plays, television plays, and a children’s book; Place of the Heart is her English-language debut.

A.M. Homes is the author of the novels May We Be Forgiven (2012), This Book Will Save Your Life (2006), Music For Torching (1999), The End of Alice (1996), In a Country of Mothers (1993), and Jack (1989). She also penned the short-story collections Things You Should Know (2002) and The Safety of Objects (1990), the best-selling memoir The Mistress’s Daughter (2007), the travel memoir Los Angeles: People, Places and the Castle on the Hill (2002), and the artist’s book Appendix A (1996).

Bob Holman is best known as an impresario of new poetry: slams, hip-hop, and performance, but he has also written eight books. Most recently he collaborated with Chuck Close on A Couple of Ways of Doing Something. Holman is the Proprietor of the Bowery Poetry Club and teaches at New York University and Columbia University. He is currently working on On the Griot Trail, a documentary about the poetry of endangered languages that includes footage from a recent two-month shoot in West Africa; and another documentary about Allen Ginsberg's experiences in India.

Presented in association with Scandinavia House, and co- sponsored by The Copenhagen, with support from the Consulate General of Denmark, New York, the Consulate General of Finland in New York, the Consulate General of Iceland in New York, the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York, the Consulate General of Sweden in New York, The Danish Arts Foundation, Finnish Literature Exchange, Icelandic Literature Center, the Nordic Culture Fund, NORLA – Norwegian Literature Abroad: Fiction & Non-Fiction, and the Swedish Arts Council.

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Learning from Each Other:
Gender Equality in Iceland and the U.S.

Thursday, May 1, 8:15 am – 12 pm
Free, but RSVP required to iacc@mfa.is

"Iceland was the first country where all the highest Offices of State and Church have been held by women: the President of the Republic, the Prime Minister, the Bishop and the Presidents of the Parliament and the Supreme Court. How did it happen? That is the essence of our New York dialogue."

- His Excellency Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President of Iceland

Iceland leads the world in closing the gender gap that has held back women around the globe for centuries and the U.S. holds the highest ranking among the largest nations, according to The Global Gender Gap Report 2014, issued by the World Economic Forum.

This one-day conference focuses on why and how the people of Iceland have achieved near equality between the genders and how Americans have continued to close the gap in the U.S.

Program Agenda
Welcome | Jón Sigurðsson, ChairmanIACC, President and CEO, Össur
Opening remarks | Nancy Ploeger, President, Manhattan Chamber of Commerce
Presentation #1: The Iceland Story | Kristín Ástgeirsdóttir, Director, The Center for Gender Equality, Iceland
Presentation #2: Gender Equality in the U.S.: The Present and Future | Deborah Gillis, President & CEO, Catalyst NYC
Panel: Gender Equality Issues in Both Countries | Kristín Ástgeirsdóttir; Deborah Gillis; Ambassador Gréta Gunnarsdóttir, Permanent Representative of Iceland to the United Nations; moderated by Lisa Kassenaar, Editor-at-Large, Global Women’s Coverage, Bloomberg News
Presentation #3: Challenges for Women in Business | Marsha Firestone, Women Presidents Organization
Panel: Challenges for Women Business Owners Today | Marsha Firestone; Herdís Fjeldsted, The Enterprise Investment Fund; Guðbjörg Glód Logadóttir, Founder and CEO, Fylgifiskar; moderated by Nancy Ploeger, MCC
Closing Remarks | His Excellency Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President of Iceland

Presented by The Icelandic-American Chamber of Commerce and the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with The American-Scandinavian Foundation; and co-sponsored by Icelandair, Eimskip, Siggi’s Skyr, Össur, High Liner Foods, and Century Aluminum.

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Older and Happier!
A Book Event with Dag Sebastian Ahlander

Wednesday, May 7, 5 pm
Free

Dag AhlanderSome retired men are reasonably happy, some are dissatisfied, and some have simply resigned themselves to their situation. After retiring, Dag Sebastian Ahlander, former Swedish Consul General in New York, learned the importance of relishing his age – despite setbacks – in order to get the most possible satisfaction in his “golden years.” Drawing from his own experience, Ahlander penned Older and Happier! Inspiring, Amusing, and Useful Advice for Men of a Certain Age (Skyhorse Publishing, May 2014), a thought-provoking call to transformation and a practical guide to making simple changes for a happier life.

Ahlander will do a short reading from his book, offering up his pearls of wisdom for happy, old men. Copies of the book will also be available for purchase and signing.

About the author

Dag Sebastian Ahlander (b. 1944, Uppsala, Sweden) trained as a lawyer and served in his country’s foreign service, where he was Consul General in New York from 1992 to 1999. He is now a successful author of historical biographies for young adults, including Queen Christina, Alfred Noble, and Raoul Wallenberg. Older and Happier! Inspiring, Amusing, and Useful Advice for Men of a Certain Age was first published in Sweden by Bonnier in early 2012 and quickly became a best-seller; this English translation of the book is its second, after Norway, where the book also became a best-seller. Older and Happier! will also be released in Danish and Finnish in 2014.

Special thanks to Skyhorse Publishing.

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Sami StoriesIndigenous Expressions and Identity:
A Symposium

Saturday, May 10, 3:30 pm
Free, but RSVP encouraged

Sámi Stories: Art and Identity of an Arctic People opens with an afternoon symposium offering in-depth perspectives on Sámi history, identity, and visual culture. The program will feature a panel discussion with contemporary artists Britta Marakatt-Labba, Aslaug Juliussen, and Jason Lujan; renowned musician Mari Boine; and curators Charis Gullickson, Northern Norway Art Museum and Marit Anne Hauan, University of Tromsø Museum.

Program Schedule
3:30 pmWelcome | Edward P. Gallagher, President, The American-Scandinavian Foundation
3:40 pmIntroductory Remarks | Dr. Anne Husebekk, Rector, University of Tromsø and Knut Ljøgodt, Director, Northern Norway Art Museum
4 pmTalk: Sámi Identity & Citizenship | Dr. Anne Julie Semb, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Oslo
4:20 pmBreak/Coffee
4:40 pmPanel Discussion | Renowned musician Mari Boine and contemporary artists Aslaug Juliussen, Britta Marakatt-Labba, and Jason Lujan in conversation with Charis Gullickson, Curator of Contemporary Art, Northern Norway Art Museum and Marit Anne Hauan, Director, University of Tromsø Museum
5:40 pm Audience Q & A
5:50 pm Short Perfomance | Marie Boine Trio
6 pm Exhibition Opening Reception

Exhibition-related educational programs have been supported in part by Scandinavian Seminar and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York.

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Paper Vikings: The Past and Present of Icelandic Literature
Lecture by Guðmundur Andri Thorsson

Tuesday, May 20, 6:30 pm
Free

While neighboring Denmark, Norway, and Sweden went on Viking raids in Europe, the people of Iceland, a small, isolated nation of Nordic and Gaelic origin in the Atlantic Ocean, gradually became “Paper Vikings,” winning their battles and deeds in words that would eventually end up on paper. They were dreamers, poets, and storytellers who continued to write for centuries in their own – and gradually more obscure – language. As Iceland fell off the European map, its people continued to copy and add to their extraordinary heritage, even when no one in the outside world could or cared to read it.

For Icelandic writers today, this heritage is both a privilege and a burden: they are keepers of a proud tradition, but they must also look to their own times, reflecting on the profound social upheavals of the 20th century that saw Iceland emerge as a modern Nordic nation, followed by the economic boom and devastating collapse in the 21st century.

Iceland's literary traditions date back to the founding of Iceland in the 9th century. Despite its geographical position and small population, Iceland produced some of the most remarkable literary treasures of the Middle Ages, in particular the sagas and Eddic poetry. Guðmundur Andri Thorsson, esteemed Icelandic author and literary critic, discusses how this rich literary history continues to inspire and influence contemporary authors - including himself.

About the author

Guðmundur Andri ThorssonGuðmundur Andri Thorsson (b. 1957, Reykjavík) is a highly-regarded face on the Icelandic literary scene, known for both his books and his weekly column in Iceland’s most widely-circulated newspaper Fréttablaðið. He holds a degree in Icelandic and comparative literature from University of Iceland (1983) and has worked for many years as an editor for Iceland’s two leading publishers Mál og Menning and Forlagið.

Thorsson's first novel, My Joyful Anguish/Mín káta angist, was published in 1988 and followed by seven more novels and books of essays and short stories. Several of his novels have been nominated for the Icelandic Literary Prize, including his latest Honor/Sæmd (2013). In 1991 Thorsson was awarded the DV Cultural Prize for Literature for the novel The Icelandic Dream/Íslenski draumurinn. In 2013 his collection of short stories The Valeyri Waltz/Valeyrarvalsinn was nominated for the Nordic Literature Prize and is currently going through publication in Germany, France, Denmark, and Norway.

Co-presented with Iceland Naturally.

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A Seminar on Literary Translation

Tuesday, May 27, 6:30 pm
Free

This panel will highlight, discuss, and explore the current opportunities and challenges of dramatic/literary translation and the international adaptation of dramatic works, with a focus on Sweden and the United States. It will also spread knowledge of Swedish funding opportunities available to literary translators as well as those commissioning and/or publishing translations from Swedish.

Joining the discussion is Swedish playwright Gertrud Larsson, Kate Loewald, founding producer of PlayCompany, American playwright Caridad Svich, and translator Rachel Willson-Broyles; moderated by Dr. Frank Hentschker, The Graduate Center, City University of New York.

About the participants

Gertrud Larsson (b. 1972, Kristianstad) is a Stockholm-based freelance playwright and comedian in the duo Åsa & Gertrud. She studied play-writing at the Dramatic Institute 2001-2004 and documentary radio training 2007-2008.

Larsson served as Artistic Director of Theatre Scenario from 2008-2009 and made her debut as a documentary filmmaker with Black Carina/Svarta Carina, which was broadcast on Swedish Radio in January 2009.

In 2009 she received the Kristiansblad Culture Prize and her play A Turk, a Gay, a Chilean/En turk, en bög, en chilenare was named by Nummer.se magazine the "Year's Best Performance in northern Sweden" and Editor's Choice 2009.

Her other works include Pedal to the Metal/Gasen i botten (2007), Asylum Shopping/Asylshopping (2009), Blue Wings/Blåvingar (2011), Dept. 305/Avd 305 (2011), The Happiest Chickens in the World/Världens lyckligaste kycklingar (2013), and Zoo/CannibalSyndrome/Zoo/Kannibalsyndromet (2013).

Kate Loewald created PlayCompany (PlayCo) in 1998 with her late partners Mike Ockrent and Jack Temchin. To date PlayCo has produced 19 world, American, and New York premieres of plays from Sweden, Poland, Japan, Romania, India, Germany, Russia, France, Britain, and the United States. In 2007 the company received an OBIE Award for its “unique contribution to the Off-Broadway theater community.” Now in its 13th season, PlayCo develops and produces adventurous new plays from the U.S. and around the world, advancing a dynamic global view of contemporary theater and expanding the American theater repertoire. As the only New York theater regularly producing outstanding contemporary plays from abroad alongside new American work, PlayCo's distinctive international programming links American theater with world theater, American artists with the global creative community, and American audiences with a whole world of plays.

From 1990-99 Loewald oversaw programming and creative development as the Head of the Literary Department at the Manhattan Theatre Club (MTC). She collaborated with many playwrights and directors on new plays, including Terrence McNally, Jon Robin Baitz, Richard Greenberg, Donald Margulies, Elizabeth Swados, Cheryl West, Kia Corthron, Joe Mantello, Mark Brokaw, and Nicholas Martin, among others. Loewald also created the MTC Playwriting Fellowships for emerging writers and was Director of the institution’s acclaimed Writers in Performance series (1998-99), producing an innovative program of literary events featuring such writers and performers as Walter Mosley, Norman Mailer, James Baldwin, Gish Jen, Alec Baldwin, Bill Murray, Buck Henry, Anita Desai, Robert Pinsky, Sydney Schanberg, and Arnold Wesker. Prior to MTC, Loewald was producing associate to Margo Lion on George C. Wolfe’s Jelly’s Last Jam (1992-93), Martha Clarke’s The Garden of Earthly Delights (1987), and other plays on and off Broadway.

Caridad Svich is an award-winning playwright, translator of plays, poetry and fiction, and Drama Editor for Asymptote Literary translation journal.

In 2012 Svich an OBIE Award for Lifetime Achievement in the theater, a 2012 Edgerton Foundation New Play Award for Guapa, and the 2011 American Theatre Critics Association Primus Prize for her play The House of the Spirits, based on the Isabel Allende novel. She has won the National Latino Playwriting Award (sponsored by Arizona Theatre Company) twice including in the year 2013 for her play Spark. Svich has been short-listed for the PEN Award in Drama four times, including in 2012 for her play Magnificent Waste. In January 2014 In the Time of the Butterflies (based on the Julia Alvarez novel) made its English language premiere at San Diego Repertory Theatre under the direction of Herbert Siguenza and Todd Salovey. Additional awards/recognitions are the Harvard University Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship; TCG/Pew Charitable Trusts National Theater Artist Residency at INTAR; and NEA/TCG Playwriting Residency at the Mark Taper Theatre Forum Latino Theatre Initiative.

Her key works include 12 Ophelias, Any Place But Here, Alchemy of Desire/Dead-Man's Blues, Iphigenia Crash Land Falls on the Neon Shell That Was Once Her Heart (a rave fable) and The Way of Water. Seven of her plays are published in Instructions for Breathing and Other Plays (Seagull Books and University of Chicago Press, 2014). Five of her plays radically re-imagining ancient Greek tragedies are published in Blasted Heavens (Eyecorner Press, University of Denmark, 2012). Her works are also published by TCG, Broadway Play Publishing, Manchester University Press, Playscripts, Arte Publico Press, Smith & Kraus, Alexander Street Press, StageReads, among others. Among her awards/recognitions are: Harvard University Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship TCG/Pew Charitable Trusts National Theater Artist Residency at INTAR, NEA/TCG Playwriting Residency at the Mark Taper Theatre Forum Latino Theatre Initiative.

She has edited several book on theatre including Out of Silence: Censorship in Theatre & Performance and Trans-Global Readings: Crossing Theatrical Boundaries. She sustains a parallel career as a theatrical translator, chiefly of the dramatic work of Federico Garcia Lorca as well as works by Calderon de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Julio Cortazar and contemporary works from Mexico, Cuba and Spain.

She is alumna playwright of New Dramatists, Drama Editor of Asymptote literary journal, associate editor of Contemporary Theatre Review (Routledge,UK), contributing editor of Theatre Forum, and founder of No Passort theatre alliance and press, which recently published Todd London's The Importance of Staying Earnest.

Rachel Willson-Broyles is a freelance translator specializing in translating contemporary literature from Swedish to English. She received her B.A. in Scandinavian Studies from Gustavus Adolphus College in 2002 and her Ph.D. in Scandinavian Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2013.

Her translations include, among many others, Jonas Hassen Khemiri's novel Montecore and play INVASION! and I call My Brothers, both successfully staged by PlayCompany in NYC.

Dr. Frank Hentschker holds a Ph.D. in Theater from the Theater Institute in Giessen, Germany. In 2009 he joined the Faculty of the Ph.D. Program in Theater at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Dr. Hentschker currently serves as Executive Director and Director of Programs at the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center (MESTC), an institute for theater based at the CUNY Graduate Center. Since he joined MESTC in this capacity in 2001 Dr. Hentschker has transformed the organization into a premier forum for public programming in international and U.S. theater and theater studies. He also founded the acclaimed annual Prelude – at the Forefront of Contemporary NYC Theater Festival, which features 20 New York-based theater companies and playwrights at the Center each fall. Dr. Hentschker also started the PEN World Voices Playwrights Series, in partnership with the PEN America Center's PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature, and has led 19 CUNY performing arts centers in the formation of the CUNY C-PAC Performing Arts Consortium, producing its first joint festival in 2009. Each year, Dr. Hentschker curates and produces approximately 40 events for MESTC, featuring lecture-demonstrations, symposia, works-in-progress, and conversations with theater scholars, theatrical luminaries, and emerging voices in the international and local theater scenes.

Support by Swedish Arts Council and the Consulate General of Sweden in New York.

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Talk and Art: On the Catastrophe of Climate Change

Tuesday, June 10, 6 pm
Free, but RSVP required

Global Crisis Information Network (GCINET), an action-oriented and awareness-raising team of Finnish and American activists concerned about climate change, combines a talk on climate change with art and performance, intending to simultaneously reach minds and touch souls, motivating audiences to take urgent action on the global climate crisis.

Moving between “talk” and “art,” the program will feature talks by climate change, energy, and sustainability experts Dr. Jouni Keronen, CIO and Vice President of Innovation Development, Fortum Corporation and Dr. Tapio Kanninen, Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Project on Sustainable Global Governance at the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of The City University of New York, and performances by singer-songwriter Laura Airaksinen, trumpet, Julian Smith, bass, and Yoichi Sato, drums. In response to Keronen’s key note speech, Csaba Körösi, Ambassador of Hungary to the United States, will provide the U.N.’s perspective. Inka Juslin, dancer, choreographer, and Doctor of Philosophy, will perform Swan, a dance solo that illustrates the relationship of humans and animals to nature. Finnish actor Heli Sirviö moderates.

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Duodji: Sámi Traditional Objects
Lecture by Dr. Thomas DuBois, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tuesday, June 24, 6:30 pm
Free

DuodjiIn this talk, Dr. Thomas DuBois, University of Wisconsin-Madison, introduces some of the basic considerations of form, substance, and use that characterize traditional Sámi objects. He shows how in Sámi art, aesthetic values are inseparable from other considerations such as usefulness, belief, and skill. A sense of beauty arises from practical concerns, but this pragmatic approach means that beauty comes to pervade all aspects of life, even the performance of ordinary, mundane activities. The talk will be illustrated through abundant images, some of which are paralleled by elements seen in Sámi Stories.

About Dr. Thomas DuBois

Thomas DuBois is a professor of Scandinavian Studies and Folklore at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He researches and writes particularly on Finnish and Sámi cultures, past and present. Along with numerous books and articles, DuBois has translated important works of Sámi literature, including Johan Turi's An Account of the Sámi, the first book ever written in Sámi language, which appeared in 1910.

Exhibition-related educational programs have been supported in part by Scandinavian Seminar and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York.

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Artist Talk with Marja Helander

Tuesday, July 29, 6:30 pm
Free

DuodjiFinnish-Sámi artist Marja Helander and American artist Janet Biggs discuss Helander’s artistic practices and her 2001 photographic series Modern Nomads, currently on view in Sámi Stories: Art and Identity of an Arctic People.

About Marja Helander

Marja Helander (b. 1965) is a Finnish Sámi photographer. Helander, who grew up in urban Helsinki, uses her dual heritage as inspiration for many of her works. In the series Modern Nomads, Helander playfully illustrates the contrast between her modern, city life and her Sámi heritage.

About Janet Biggs

Janet Biggs is an American artist, known primarily for her work in video, photography and performance. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Biggs has captured such events as kayaks performing a synchronized ballet in Arctic waters, sulfur miners inside an active volcano, and a camel caravan crossing the Taklamakan desert of Western China.

Biggs received her undergraduate degree from Moore College of Art, and pursued graduate studies at Rhode Island School of Design. She is represented by CONNERSMITH, Washington, DC, and Galerie Anita Beckers (Blink Video Art), Frankfurt, Germany.

Exhibition-related educational programs have been supported in part by Scandinavian Seminar and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York. Funding for artist travel was received from Frame Visual Arts Finland.

See also Sámi Stories: Art and Identity of an Arctic People in EXHIBITIONS section.

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Searching for Wineland: Saga and Evidence
Lecture by Páll Bergþórsson

Tuesday, August 12, 6:30 pm
Free

Revered as the foundation of Icelandic culture, The Sagas of Icelanders/Íslendingasögur are unique in medieval literature and are collectively one of Iceland’s greatest contributions to the world’s cultural heritage. Two of these sagas – Erik the Red’s Saga/Eirík saga rauða and The Saga of the Greenlanders/Grænlendinga saga – are the main literary sources of information for the Norse exploration of North America and recount the extraordinary navigational achievements of Leifur Eiríksson and the first European attempts to establish a settlement in the vast new continent of America.

In a fascinating story of historical sleuthing, Icelandic author and meteorologist Bergþórsson plays detective, combining detailed scrutiny of the Icelandic sagas with a variety of other evidence, e.g. archaeology, geography, meteorology, navigation, anthropology, botany, and zoology, and his own explorations, to locate Eiríksson’s Wineland (otherwise known as Vinland).

About Páll Bergþórsson

Páll Bergþórsson (b. 1923) is an Icelandic meteorologist and author of The Wineland Millennium: Saga and Evidence/Vínlandsgátan (Mál og menning, 1997/2000 in English), which was nominated for the Icelandic Literature Prize in 1997.

From 1989 – 1993 Bergþórsson served as director of the Icelandic Meteorological Office, during which time he wrote many books and papers on meteorology. After his retirement from the Icelandic Meteorological Office in 1993, Bergþórsson embarked on four expeditions between 1996 and 2002 to examine local conditions in relationship to the Icelandic explorers in America.

Co-presented with the Consulate General of Iceland in New York.

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Older and Wiser!
A Book Event with Dag Sebastian Ahlander

Tuesday, October 7, 1 pm
Free

Older and Wiser!
A Book Event with Dag Sebastian AhlanderOlder and Wiser! is the sequel to Older and Happier! (Skyhorse Publishing, 2014), Dag Sebastian Ahlander’s guide to turning retirement into a time of self-exploration. Older and Wiser! (Skyhorse Publishing, October 2014) reflects on the big (and little) things in life and contains practical suggestions and reflections on aging from the world’s greatest philosophers, writers, and thinkers.

Copies of Older and Wiser! will also be available for purchase and signing following the program.

About the author

Dag Sebastian Ahlander (b. 1944, Uppsala, Sweden) trained as a lawyer and served in his country’s foreign service, where he was Consul General in New York from 1992 to 1999. He is now an author of historical biographies for young adults, including Queen Christina, Alfred Nobel, and Raoul Wallenberg. Older and Happier! Inspiring, Amusing, and Useful Advice for Men of a Certain Age was first published in Sweden by Bonnier in early 2012.

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Uncommon Ground: Artists and the Icelandic Landscape

Thursday, October 9, 6 pm
Free | #IcelandArt

Uncommon Ground: Artists and the Icelandic Landscape

ICELAND: Artists Respond to Place opens with an introductory talk by curator Pari Stave and a conversation between featured artists, including Einar Falur Ingólfsson, Guðjón Ketilsson, Eggert Pétursson, and Ragna Róbertsdóttir, moderated by Pari Stave and critic Gregory Volk.

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TOVE JANSSON CENTENARY CELEBRATION
The Woman Who Borrowed Memories
Discussion & Book Release

Monday, October 20, 6:30 pm
Free

TOVE JANSSON CENTENARY CELEBRATION
The Woman Who Borrowed Memories
Discussion & Book ReleaseFinnish author Philip Teir joins American author Kathryn Davis in conversation as they discuss the life and legacy of Tove Jansson – one of Finland’s most beloved artists and authors – and celebrate the release of her short stories published in English for the first time.

During her lifetime Jansson wrote 11 novels and short story collections for adults. The Woman Who Borrowed Memories: Selected Stories (NYRB Classics, 2014) brings together a generous selection of writings from her earliest stories in the 1970s to those she wrote before her death in 2001.

The Woman Who Borrowed Memories: Selected Stories will be available for purchase after the program.

About Tove Jansson

Tove Jansson (1914-2001) was born in Helsinki into Finland’s Swedish-speaking minority. Her father was a sculptor and her mother a graphic designer and illustrator. Winters were spent in the family’s art-filled studio and summers in a fisherman’s cottage on the shore of the Gulf of Finland, a setting that would later figure in Jansson’s writing for adults and children.

TOVE JANSSONJansson loved books as a child and set out from an early age to be an artist. Her first illustration was published when she was 15 years old; four years later a picture book appeared under a pseudonym. After attending art schools in both Stockholm and Paris, she returned to Helsinki, where in the 1940s and ’50s she won acclaim for her paintings and murals. From 1929 until 1953 Jansson drew humorous illustrations and political cartoons for the left-leaning anti-Fascist Finnish-Swedish magazine Garm, and it was there that what was to become Jansson’s most famous creation, Moomintroll, a character with a dreamy disposition, made his first appearance.

She went on to write about the adventures of Moomintroll, the Moomin family, and their curious friends in a long-running comic strip and in a series of books for children that have been translated throughout the world, inspiring films, several television series, an opera, and theme parks in Finland and Japan. Jansson also wrote 11 novels and short story collections for adults, including Fair Play (2011), The Summer Book (2008), and The True Deceiver (2009) (all available as NYRB Classics). In 1994 she was awarded the Prize of the Swedish Academy. Jansson and her companion, the artist Tuulikki Pietilä, continued to live part-time in a cottage on the remote outer edge of the Finnish archipelago until 1991.

Philip TeirAbout Philip Teir

Philip Teir (b. 1980) is a Finland-Swede and considered one of the most promising young writers in Finland. After several years as culture editor of Hufvudstadsbladet, the highest-circulation Swedish-language newspaper in Finland, he now works as a fulltime author and freelancer. Teir has published poetry and short stories, and has contributed to several anthologies; his first novel The Winter War: A Novel about Marriage/Vinterkriget: En äktenskapsroman (Schildts & Söderströms, 2013) will be published in English in 2015 by Serpent’s Tail with a translation by Tiina Nunnally. Teir lives and works in Helsinki.

About Kathryn Davis

Kathryn DavisKathryn Davis (b. 1946) is the author of seven novels, the most recent of which are Duplex (Graywolf Press, 2013) and The Thin Place (Little, Brown, 2006). Her other books are Labrador (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 1988); The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf (Knopf, 1993); Hell: A Novel (Ecco, 1998); The Walking Tour (Houghton Mifflin, 1999); and Versailles (Houghton Mifflin, 2002). An award-winning novelist, Davis has received the Janet Heidiger Kafka Prize (1988); the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1999); and a Guggenheim Fellowship (2000). In 2006, she won a Lannan Foundation Literary Award. Davis lives in Vermont and teaches in the MFA program at Washington University in St. Louis, where she is the Hurst Senior Writer-in-Residence.

Co-presented by The New York Review of Books. Supported in part by a grant from The Swedish Cultural Foundation in Finland/Svenska Kulturfonden.

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The Immigrant and the University:
Peder Sather and Gold Rush California
Book Talk with Karin Sveen

Monday, October 27, 6:30 pm
Free

Norwegian writer Karin Sveen, author of The Immigrant and the University: Peder Sather and Gold Rush California (University of California Press, 2014), tells the story of a poor Norwegian farm boy who achieves the American dream: Peder Sather was living on a farm in a remote corner of Norway when he immigrated to the U.S. in 1832 and made a large fortune that he then used to found the University of California, Berkeley.

The Immigrant and the University: 
Peder Sather and Gold Rush California
Book Talk with Karin Sveen

The Immigrant and the University will be available for signing and purchase after the program.

About Peder Sather
and the book

Peder Sather was a scribe before he emigrated from Norway to New York in 1832. There, he worked as a servant and a clerk at a lottery office before opening an exchange brokerage. During the gold rush, he moved to San Francisco to help establish the banking house of Drexel, Sather & Church on Montgomery Street. Sather was a founder and a liberal benefactor of the University of California, Berkeley, where he is memorialized by the Sather Gate and Sather Tower (the Campanile), three endowed professorships, and more recently the Peder Sather Center for Advanced Study.

The book offers readers a look at the life of a successful entrepreneur and a leading patron of California who engaged in all levels of public education; supported Abraham Lincoln; and worked to give emancipated slaves housing, schooling, and employment after the Civil War. Sather’s legacy, vivid persona, and the frontier city of his time are brought to life with interesting anecdotes of many famous people – General William T. Sherman, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, Norwegian violinist Ole Bull, and above all, his close friend Anthony J. Drexel, legendary Philadelphia financier and one of the founders of Wall Street.

To purchase the book: http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520276482

About the author

Karin Sveen is a Norwegian poet, novelist, and essayist. She was awarded the Norsk språkpris (Norwegian Language Prize) in 2007.

Supported in part by NORLA – Norwegian Literature Abroad: Fiction & Non-Fiction and Norwegian House Foundation.

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New Developments in the Arctic
The Sønsteby/Whist Lecture by Dr. Olav Orheim

Tuesday, October 28, 6 pm
Free, but reservations are required | Please call 212.847.9725 for seat availability

New Developments in the Arctic
The Sønsteby/Whist Lecture by Dr. Olav OrheimThe past two years have seen the Arctic scene changing at an accelerating rate. Renowned polar expert Dr. Olav Orheim will examine new developments – political, climate, and transportation – occurring in the far north. Several countries, including China, India, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore, became observers to the Arctic Council in May 2013, indicating a significant increase in political attention in Asia on what is happening in the Arctic. The European Union also wants in on the action. One reason for increased interest could be that in September 2012 the ice in the Arctic Ocean had a minimum extent far below any previous record – opening new ice-free sailing routes. Other reasons could be related to resources, and a wish to be present on a scene of new political developments.

This lecture is presented as a tribute to the memory of Norwegian Resistance hero and 2001 ASF Cultural Award Winner Gunnar Sønsteby.

About Dr. Olav Orheim

Dr. Olav Orheim is a distinguished Norwegian polar expert, who has been deeply involved in Arctic affairs from the Cold War period to the present. His career includes Professor at University of Bergen and Director of the Norwegian Polar Institute from 1993 to 2005. From 2005 to 2012, Orheim was in charge of International Polar Year activities at the Research Council of Norway.

About Gunnar Sønsteby

As the chief of operations in the Norwegian Resistance Movement during the German occupation in Norway during World War II, Gunnar Sønsteby (1918–2012) – also known as "Kjakan" ("The Chin") and "No. 24" – saved countless lives and went on to become his country’s most highly decorated citizen. Following the war, he lived and studied in the United States before returning to Norway in 1955. His book, Report from No. 24, chronicling his wartime activities, was published in 1960.

Sønsteby’s visionary support helped to establish Norway’s Resistance Museum in Oslo, which ensures that his and future generations will remember the struggle the Norwegians fought on their own soil during a time of foreign occupation. He spent many years giving lectures at schools, universities, civic organizations, and cultural institutions around the world, including more than 200 lectures in the U.S.

The governments of Great Britain and the United States decorated him; in 2008, he became the first non-American to receive the Special Operations Medal. He was awarded the ASF Cultural Award in 2001 "in recognition of his efforts to advance the understanding and appreciation in the United States of the challenges confronted and resistance efforts undertaken by the Norwegian people in World War II."

The lecture has been made possible by the Sønsteby/Whist Fund of The American-Scandinavian Foundation, which was established in 1998 by then-ASF Trustee Andrew Whist in honor of Mr. Sønsteby.

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Helsinki Noir Book Launch & PanelHelsinki Noir Book Launch & Panel

Tuesday, November 11, 6:30 pm
Free

In recognition of Helsinki Noir’s debut, book contributors Leena Lehtolainen and Riikka Ala-Harja sit down for a conversation on the state of Finnish crime fiction, moderated by Brooklyn Noir editor Tim McLoughlin.

The excitement around Scandinavian crime fiction coming in the wake of Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo has focused largely on Sweden, but Finland – as poignantly revealed in Helsinki Noir (Akashic Books, 2014) – is equally strong in the noir department. Helsinki Noir joins Copenhagen Noir in representing the Akashic Noir Series in the far north of Europe.

The book features brand-new stories by Leena Lehtolainen, Johanna Holmström, James Thompson, Antti Tuomainen, Jesse Itkonen, Joe L. Murr, Jukka Petäjä, Tapani Bagge, Pekka Hiltunen, Teemu Käskinen, Tuomas Lius, Riikka Ala-Harja, Karo Hämäläinen, and Jarkko Sipilä.

About the participants
Helsinki Noir Book Launch & Panel Participants

Riikka Ala-Harja (b. 1967) is a Finnish author and playwright. She has published two children’s books and six novels; Hole/Reikä (2013) was her first collection of short stories. The Landing/Maihinnousu (2012) was also published in Estonia and is the second of her novels to be nominated for the Finlandia, Finland’s greatest literary prize – the first being her prose debut Tom Tom Tom (1998). Ala-Harja lives in Helsinki.

Leena Lehtolainen (b. 1964) is the most successful female crime author in Finland; her titles consistently top the country’s best-seller lists and her best-known character is the tough, down-to-earth, and emotionally intelligent police officer Maria Kallio. More than two million copies of Lehtolainen’s books have been sold worldwide and her works have been translated into 29 languages. The author also works as a literary researcher, columnist, and critic.

Tim McLoughlin is the editor of the multiple award-winning anthology Brooklyn Noir (Akashic Books, 2004), Brooklyn Noir 2: The Classics (Akashic Books, 2005), and is the co-editor of Brooklyn Noir 3: Nothing but the Truth (Akashic Books, 2008). His debut novel Heart of the Old Country was the 2003 recipient of Italy’s Premio Penne Award and was the basis of the feature film The Narrows (2008), starring Vincent D’onofrio. McLoughlin’s short fiction and essays have appeared in numerous literary magazines and anthologies, and his work has been included in The Best American Mystery Stories (Mariner Books, 2005). He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Special thanks to Akashic Books and FILI – Finnish Literature Exchange.

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Music & Literature
with Kaija Saariaho

Thursday, November 20, 8 pm
$25 ($20 ASF Members)

Marking the U.S. launch of the international arts publication Music & Literature Magazine, Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho presents a concert with musical guests Camilla Hoitenga, Aliisa Barrière, and others devoted to exploring and celebrating her expansive career, accompanied by readings from Taylor Davis-Van Atta, publisher of Music & Literature Magazine.

Co-presented by Music & Literature Magazine and in collaboration with the Consulate General of Finland in New York and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General, New York.

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See Music & Literature with Kaija Saariaho in CONCERTS section.

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Georg Jensen: Reflections
Book Talk with Murray Moss

Tuesday, December 9, 6:30 pm
$7 ($5 ASF Members)

In his latest book Georg Jensen: Reflections (Rizzoli, 2014), curator and veteran design entrepreneur Murray Moss considers the tradition and excellence of legendary Danish design house Georg Jensen.

Georg Jensen, the preeminent luxury silver brand in the world, is the essence of Danish design and craftsmanship. Founded in 1904, Georg Jensen has a deep heritage in high-end silversmithing that represents timeless design and enduring style. The eponymous founder was trained as an artist at the turn of the 20th century and his jewelry designs in the art nouveau style won immediate acclaim. Jensen was the first design company to reach out to outside designers to ensure the best designed products in their ever-expanding lines, which include sterling silver cutlery, jewelry, watches, and housewares. Arne Jacobsen, Henning Koppel, and Nanna Ditzel are just a few of the names synonymous with Danish Modern who designed their best products for Jensen.

That tradition continues today with celebrated designers such as Jean Nouvel and Ilse Crawford. With beautiful historic photographs and drawings from Jensen’s extensive archive, which display the incredible craftsmanship and technical innovations of the highly skilled silversmiths, Georg Jensen: Reflections is a sumptuous visual celebration of Danish design. Offering a lavish and in-depth look at some of the most stunning silver creations in history, this volume is for anyone interested in design and craftsmanship.

Copies of Georg Jensen: Reflections will also be available for purchase and signing following the program.

About Murray Moss

Murray Moss is a curator, retailer, design consultant, and the founder of Moss Bureau, a design consultancy offering curatorial and interior design services, as well as a curated selection of objects, furniture and limited-edition studio works. From 1994-2012 Moss was the founder and creative mind behind the Moss design gallery in New York’s SoHo district. During these 18 years, Moss conceived and curated over 100 highly influential exhibitions at Moss as well as other venues, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London and the Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Frankfurt.

Moss has served on the Boards of the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum and the Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA). He has been acknowledged through numerous awards in his field, including House Beautiful’s Giants of Design Award (2000), the Chrysler Design Award (2002), the Russel Wright Award (2002), and Metropolitan Home’s Modernism Award (2004). In 2007 Moss was inducted into Interior Design Magazine’s Hall of Fame.

He is the author of several books published by Rizzoli, including Baccarat: Two Hundred and Fifty Years (2013) and Georg Jensen: Reflections (2014). In spring 2014 August Editions published a limited edition monograph, Tertium Quid: Pictorial Narratives Created from Vintage Press Photographs, on Moss’ extensive collection of vintage press photography.

Co-presented with the Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts.

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2013

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The Saga-Sites of Iceland
A 21st-Century Pilgrimage

Saturday, January 5, 2013, 2:30 pm
Free

The Saga-Sites of Iceland, A 21st-Century PilgrimageUsing the medieval Icelandic saga Gísla saga Súrssonar as its subject, scholar Emily Lethbridge’s Memories of Old Awake (filmed and produced by Patrick Chadwick) aims to show how Gísla saga is written into the dramatic landscapes of Iceland’s West Fjords. In the saga, which is set against the background of bare mountain-sides that plunge down into dark waters of the fjords, adulterous jealousy, wounded personal, and family honor, conflicting family loyalties, the uncompromising requirements of the 10th-century Icelandic vengeance imperative, and the inevitability of fate combine in a powerful and complex narrative.

The film’s title is a quotation from an impromptu 4-line verse about the saga’s hero, Gísli Súrsson, composed by a man who lives today in the area where Gísla saga is set. The ways in which local people still engage with “their” saga, as their predecessors did in past centuries, is a second theme explored in the film.

Memories of Old Awake was commissioned by the Office of External Affairs and Communications at the University of Cambridge. It is one of a number of short films in the “Cambridge Ideas” series, which showcases research being conducted at the University. It was filmed and produced by Patrick Chadwick who joined Lethbridge in the West Fjords for a week in May 2011. This was Chadwick’s first visit to Iceland and his first encounter with the Icelandic sagas. The weather was harsh, which made filming challenging though the bird-song in the audio signals that spring was on its way, despite appearances to the contrary.

In her lecture, Lethbridge will talk about her experiences as a “21st-century saga pilgrim” and some of the ways that her “saga fieldwork” was inspired by, converged with, and diverged from, William Gershom Collingwood's late 19th-century explorations of the medieval Icelandic sagas and their physical settings.

About Emily Lethbridge
Emily Lethbridge was awarded a Ph.D in Old Norse-Icelandic language and literature by the University of Cambridge in 2008. She subsequently held a 3-year Research Fellowship at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge, and was concurrently a Research Associate of the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge. 2011 was spent in Iceland, working on the Saga-Steads of Iceland: A 21st-Century Pilgrimage project while living in an ex-military Land Rover ambulance. In January 2012, Lethbridge took up a position as a post-doctoral Research Associate at the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, University of Iceland.

Further information about this project and Lethbridge’s work can be found at www.sagasteads.blogspot.com.

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The Future of the Arctic: A New Source of Riches
The Sønsteby/Whist Lecture by Dr. Olav Orheim

Thursday, January 10, 6:30 pm
Free admission, but reservations are required.
Please RSVP to claire@amscan.org or 212.847.9725 by Monday, January 7, 2013.

The Future of the Arctic: A New Source of Riches - The Sønsteby/Whist Lecture by Dr. Olav OrheimDistinguished Norwegian Polar expert Dr. Olav Orheim will highlight the drivers behind the rapid changes now taking place in the Arctic. An emerging race for raw materials, combined with climate change giving access to the Arctic Ocean, has lifted the High North on the global political agenda, and has brought in new players, including China.

About Dr. Olav Orheim
Dr. Olav Orheim is a distinguished Norwegian polar expert, who has been deeply involved in Arctic affairs from the Cold War period to the present. His career includes Professor at University of Bergen and director of the Norwegian Polar Institute from 1993 to 2005. From 2005 to 2012, he was in charge of International Polar Year activities at the Research Council of Norway.

About Gunnar Sønsteby
As the chief of operations in the Norwegian Resistance Movement during the German occupation in Norway during World War II, Gunnar Sønsteby (1918–2012) — also known as "Kjakan" ("The Chin") and "No. 24" — saved countless lives and went on to become his country’s most highly decorated citizen. Following the war, he lived and studied in the United States before returning to Norway in 1955. His book, Report from No. 24, chronicling his wartime activities, was published in 1960.

Mr. Sønsteby’s visionary support helped to establish Norway’s Resistance Museum in Oslo, which ensures that his and future generations will remember the struggle the Norwegians fought on their own soil during a time of foreign occupation. He spent many years giving lectures at schools, universities, civic organizations, and cultural institutions around the world, including more than 200 lectures in the U.S.

He was decorated by the governments of Great Britain and the United States; in 2008, he became the first non-American to receive the Special Operations Medal. He was awarded the ASF Cultural Award in 2001 "in recognition of his efforts to advance the understanding and appreciation in the United States of the challenges confronted and resistance efforts undertaken by the Norwegian people in World War II."

This lecture is presented as a tribute to the memory of Norwegian Resistance hero and 2001 ASF Cultural Award Winner Gunnar Sønsteby. It has been made possible by the Sønsteby/Whist Fund of The American-Scandinavian Foundation, which was established in 1998 by ASF Trustee Andrew Whist in honor of Mr. Sønsteby.

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Anders Zorn: A European Artist Seduces America
with Curator Oliver Tostmann

Tuesday, February 5, 6:30 pm
Free

Anders Zorn, The Omnibus, 1892, Oil on canvas, 126 x 88 cm, Courtesy of Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, BostonOne of Sweden's foremost artists Anders Zorn (1860 – 1920) was one of the leading and most celebrated artists during the Belle Epoch. Today, however, his work is widely unknown outside Sweden and is dispersed between collections all over Europe and the U.S. Moreover, Zorn is either seen as a portrait painter in the wake of John Singer Sargent (1856 – 1925) or as a painter of idyllic genre scenes.

Curator Oliver Tostmann will investigate Zorn’s role in the movement of modernist art, his international career, and his remarkable artistic talents in light of an upcoming exhibition at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston that will bring rarely seen works together and present Zorn as one of the leading artists of his time.

About Oliver Tostmann

The Shimmer of Possibility: The Helsinki School and the Expansion of Photography, Lecture with Lyle RexerOliver Tostmann studied art history and history at the Freie Universität Berlin, Paris Sorbonne, and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa. After completing his Ph.D., he became the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Department of Italian Paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Since 2001 he is the Lia and William Poorvu curator of the collection at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

This lecture has been made possible by a grant from SWEA New Jersey.

Image, above right: Anders Zorn, The Omnibus, 1892, Oil on canvas, 126 x 86 cm, Courtesy of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston.

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The Shimmer of Possibility:
The Helsinki School and the Expansion of Photography
Lecture with Lyle Rexer

Tuesday, February 19, 6:30 pm
Free

The Shimmer of Possibility: The Helsinki School and the Expansion of Photography, Lecture with Lyle RexerLyle Rexer, professor at the School of Visual Arts and author of The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography (2009), discusses the Helsinki School’s contribution to the expanded field of contemporary photography.

About Lyle Rexer

Lyle Rexer (b. 1951) was educated at the University of Michigan, Columbia University, and Merton College, Oxford University, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Columbia University. He is the author of several books, including Photography’s Antiquarian Avant-Garde: The New Wave in Old Processes (2002); Jonathan Lerman: The Drawings of an Artist with Autism (2002); How to Look at Outsider Art (2005); and The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography (2009). In addition to his book projects, Rexer has published many catalogue essays dealing with contemporary artists and collections and contributes articles on art, architecture, photography, and culture to a variety of publications, including The New York Times, Art in America, Modern Painters, Aperture, Metropolis, Parkett, Tate, and Raw Vision, among others.

As a curator, he has organized exhibitions in the United States and internationally, including Fernando Cánovas, a retrospective of the Argentine painter held at the Insitiut Valencia d’Art Modern (2007). For the Aperture Foundation he curated The Edge of Vision, an exhibition of contemporary abstract photography, which is traveling through 2013. Rexer teaches at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and is a columnist for Photograph magazine.

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100 Years of ASF: How Has the World Changed Over the Last Century?
A Curtis L. Carlson Centennial Lecture with Jan Egeland

Monday, March 11, 6 pm
Free admission, but reservations are required.

To mark the 100th anniversary of the ASF Fellowship Program in 2012, the ASF presents another in the ongoing series of Curtis L. Carlson Lectures. Deputy Executive Director of Human Rights Watch and 1982 ASF International Law Fellow Jan Egeland discusses the ways in which the world has changed in the 100 years since the ASF's founding, specifically touching on recent global trends and issues of war and peace, dictatorship and democracy, economic development and poverty, human rights, and climate change.

The Curtis L. Carlson Distinguished Lecture series was created by the Carlson Family Foundation to support public discourse on issues and topics of particular relevance to the people of the United States and the Nordic nations.

About Jan Egeland

Jan EgelandJan Egeland is the Deputy Executive Director of Human Rights Watch and the director of its European operations. Prior to joining Human Rights Watch, he was the executive director of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs. As U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator from 2003 to 2006, Egeland helped reform the global humanitarian response system and organized the international response to the Asian tsunami and crises from Darfur to the Democratic Republic of Congo to Lebanon. In 2006, Time magazine named him one of the 100 "people who shape our world." From 1999 to 2002, he was the U.N. Secretary-General's Special Adviser on Colombia, and from 1990 to 1997 he was State Secretary in the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He has 30 years of experience from international work with human rights, humanitarian situations, and conflict resolution, and was among the initiators of the peace negotiations that led to The Oslo Accords between Israel and Palestine Liberation Organization in 1993.

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Strindberg and Friends
A Tribute in Memory of Harry G. Carlson

Tuesday, March 19, 6:30 pm
Free

August StrindbergThe internationally-acclaimed Strindberg scholar, translator, and former ASF Fellow Harry G. Carlson (Strindberg and the Poetry of Myth, 1982; Out of Inferno: Strindberg's Reawakening as an Artist, 1996; Strindberg: Five Plays, 1984) passed away in December 2012, at the end of the August Strindberg centennial year. This evening Carlson's legacy will be celebrated with readings from his unpublished Strindberg translations by Scandinavian American Theater Company (SATC) and accolades from colleagues, students, and collaborators, including Marvin Carlson, The Sidney E. Cohn Distinguished Professor of Theatre, CUNY Graduate Center; Seth Baumrin, Chairman of the Department of Communication and Theatre Arts, John Jay College of Criminal Justice; Mary Reilly, Director of Artist Services, Brooklyn Academy of Music; and Eszter Szalczer, Associate Professor of Theatre, University at Albany, State University of New York.

About Harry G. Carlson

Harry G. Carlson (1930 – 2012), professor of theater history and modern drama and internationally published scholar and translator of Swedish literature, is best known as a leading authority on the works of August Strindberg and Lars Forsell, and as a great Strindberg scholar who above all others transformed the Swedish playwright from a peculiar Swede to a foundational figure of literary modernism. His books and scholarly articles were published in both English and Swedish and were translated into many other languages.

Harry G. CarlsonHis most influential books include Strindberg and the Poetry of Myth and Out of Inferno: Strindberg's Reawakening as an Artist. At the time of his death he left behind a yet unpublished manuscript on August Strindberg as a painter and his relationship to French artists and artist colonies of his time. He also translated many scholarly works from Swedish into English, including August Strindberg by Martin Lamm (1971) and The Art of Acting by Frederik Schyberg (1961), which became classic texts for students of drama and theater worldwide. Carlson's highly praised play translations (found in his Strindberg: Five Plays and in Modern Nordic Plays: Sweden, 1980, among other published volumes) continue to be widely read and produced by theater companies internationally. He also had a life-long engagement with the theater and worked on productions both in Sweden and in the U.S. as dramaturg and simultaneous interpreter.

After earning his Ph.D. at Ohio State University he taught at various universities in Illinois and Georgia, and finally at the Department of Drama, Theater and Dance at Queens College and the Ph.D. program in Theater at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). Even after retiring from CUNY, he remained active as a teacher until his death, lecturing on Shakespeare for enthusiastic groups of students on Long Island, most recently at the Amagansett Public Library.

Born in New York City, Carlson was raised in the Bronx, was drafted upon graduating from college, and served in the Korean War. For his achievement as scholar and translator he was awarded an honorary Doctorate from Umeå University, Sweden (1990), and was recipient of many prestigious honors and awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship (1966), and fellowships from The American-Scandinavian Foundation in 1956 and 1996.

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Exhibition Icon

On the Helsinki School
Curator Timothy Persons in Conversation
with Anni Leppälä and Saana Wang

Tuesday, April 2, 6:30 pm
Free

New Wave Finland co-curator Timothy Persons leads Helsinki School artists Anni Leppälä and Saana Wang in a conversation on their photographic processes, the Helsinki School, and new currents in international contemporary photography.

About Timothy Persons

Timothy Persons is the Director of Professional Studies Program and a Senior Lecturer at the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture in Helsinki, Finland. Along with his position at the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture he is also the artistic leader of VIPS (Video Photography Stockholm); a senior advisor to the Borås Art Museum, Sweden; a member of the Paris Photo selection committee; the Senior Curatorial Advisor at KIASMA, the Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki, Finland (2008 – 2010); the Senior Curatorial Advisor at The Royal Library, The National Museum of Photography, Copenhagen, Denmark. He has also been an advisor to the board of the Claremont Museum of Art, California.

In addition to his duties as curator, Mr. Persons is also an artist, exhibiting mainly in Scandinavia and Germany. He has lectured at numerous universities in the United States and Europe. He has created a wide range of projects that have taken him around the world, including Central America, Africa, and the Middle East.

About Anni Leppälä

Anni Leppälä’s (b. 1981, Helsinki, Finland) photography exists in a realm of contradictions and metaphors, where dream-like narratives toy with ideas of memory, nostalgia, and the intersection of the momentary and the constant. There is a child-like nature about her work—executed through traditional forms of photography like portraiture, landscape, and interiors—with currents of symbolism running throughout. Leppälä graduated from Turku Arts Academy/Polytechnic in 2004 and continued her MA studies at the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture. From 2001 onwards, she has participated in various group exhibitions in Finland and abroad. In 2010 Leppälä was named Finland’s Young Artist of the Year and consequently held a solo exhibition at the Tampere Art Museum. Her work is found in numerous collections in Finland, France, Germany, the U.K., and the U.S. The artist lives and works in Helsinki.

About Saana Wang

Saana Wang (b. Helsinki, Finland) employs photography to explore issues of identity and notions of time and memory. She draws on the tradition of socio-documentary photography to stage situations, insinuating a deliberately fictitious and stylized layer of information. Camera in hand, Wang has recently set out to capture the fast-changing landscape of present-day China – her husband’s home country – in a series of powerful portraits that raise questions about modern society and cultural tradition.

Wang received her BA in 2000 from Gerrit Rietveld Academie, Amsterdam and held a Photo Global Residency at the School of Visual Arts in New York from 2009 to 2010. She is working on her MA in Photography from the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture. Wang has exhibited internationally over the last decade, including a solo show at Joy Wai Gallery in New York (2012) and a solo show at Photographic Centre Nykyaika in Finland. She was included in Young Photography Vory at The Finnish Museum of Photography (2013), North by New York at Scandinavia House (2011), and the prestigious show reGeneration2, organized by Galerie Azzedine Alaïa, Paris, France (2011). She has been the recipient of grants and scholarships from the Finnish Cultural Foundation, Arts Council of Finland, Alfred Kordelin Foundation, Presidential Scholars Program, and Patricia Seppälä Foundation. Wang lives and works in New York.

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Nordic Outbreak Symposium

Saturday, April 6, 10 am – 6 pm; registration 9 am
Free, but RSVP required; Lunch $20. Please RSVP to rsvp@streamingmuseum.org by Monday, April 1, 2013.

An all-day symposium in conjunction with the Streaming Museum's Nordic Outbreak, an internationally touring exhibition of over 30 video and new media artworks by groundbreaking contemporary Nordic artists. Featuring Nordic artists, curators, and theorists, the program will offer in-depth perspectives of what "the Nordic" has come to mean in the digital age.

Speakers include Erkki Huhtamo, Professor of Design Media Arts, UCLA; Daniela Arriado, curator/producer Art & New Media, Norway; Jonatan Habib Engqvist, curator and theorist; Birta Guðjónsdóttir, independent curator and artist, Iceland; Vibeke Jensen, artist and architect, Norway; Kati Kivinen, curator, KIASMA, the Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki, Finland; Jacob Lillemose, curator and writer, Germany/Denmark; Margret Elisabet Olafsdóttir, independent researcher, Reykjavík Academy; Marit Paasche, Head of Research, The Norwegian Video Art Archive; Superflex, artist group, Denmark; Egill Sæbjörnsson, artist; Iceland; Minna Tarkka, curator, Director, m-cult Centre for New Media Culture, Helsinki.

Nordic Outbreak: Confronting Tales, Futures, and Memories – a special video installation – will be on view in the Victor Borge Hall lobby April 4 through 25. For a full symposium program, please visit the Streaming Museum's website.

About Streaming Museum

Streaming Museum is a 21st-century cultural venue, founded by Nina Colosi in 2008, that produces and presents multi-media exhibitions and related programs reaching a wide global demographic via the web and a network of screens in public spaces on seven continents and through a variety of international partnerships. More information is available from the Streaming Museum's website.

Nordic Outbreak is a program of Streaming Museum, produced and curated by Tanya Toft, Nina Colosi and four Nordic curators, Daniela Arriado, Birta Guðjónsdóttir, Kati Kivinen and Jacob Lillemose, in collaboration with Scandinavia House, KIASMA, the Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki, Finland, Reykjavík Art Museum, Danish Architecture Center, Screen City Festival, Katuaq the Greenlandic Culture House of Nuuk, Kino Kino! and AV-Arkki.

Nordic Outbreak is sponsored by the Nordic Culture Fund, Nordic Culture Point, the Consulate General of Sweden in New York, the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York, the Consulate General of Finland in New York, the Consulate General of Denmark in New York, the Consulate General of Iceland in New York, OCA – Office for Contemporary Art Norway, and PNEK Production Network for Electronic Art, Norway.

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MUNCH | WARHOL Symposium:
Collectors, Curators, and Connoisseurs

Saturday, April 27, 2:30 – 5:30 pm
Free

MUNCH | WARHOL and the Multiple Image opens with an afternoon symposium that includes an introductory talk by exhibition co-curator and noted Munch scholar Dr. Patricia G. Berman and panels of collectors and curators in conversation about the prints of Munch and Warhol.

On Munch 150

Audun Eckhoff, Director, National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design; Stein Olav Henrichsen, Director, Munch Museum

Introductory Lecture

Exhibition co-curator Dr. Patricia G. Berman, Theodora L. and Stanley H. Feldberg Professor of Art, Wellesley College & University of Oslo

Collecting Edvard Munch: A Conversation

with collectors Sally Epstein and Nelson Blitz, Jr.
Moderated by Dr. Elizabeth Prelinger, Keyser Family Professor of Art History, Department of Art and Art History, Georgetown University

Warhol’s Late Prints: A Conversation

with Mary Bartow, Senior Vice President and Head of Department, Prints, Sotheby's, and Dr. Reva Wolf, Professor of Art History, SUNY New Paltz
Moderated by exhibition co-curator Pari Stave, ASF Consulting Curator

Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) gratefully acknowledges the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York for supporting this program.

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Sjón
Introduced by Björk & Moderated by Hari Kunzru

Thursday, May 9, 7 pm
Free, but RSVP is required

Sjón, the great Icelandic novelist championed by the likes of Junot Díaz, David Mitchell, and A.S. Byatt, discusses the U.S. release of his three books—The Blue Fox/Skugga-Baldur, The Whispering Muse/Argóarflísin, and From the Mouth of the Whale/Rökkurbýsnir—with fellow author Hari Kunzru (Gods Without Men). Icelandic musician and Sjón collaborator Björk will open the program.

About Sjón

SjónSjón (b. 1962, Reykjavík) is an award-winning novelist, poet, and playwright whose works have been translated into more than 25 languages. Also a lyricist, he was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe in 2000 for “I’ve Seen It All” – the song from Dancer in the Dark he co-wrote with Lars von Trier. In 2005 The Blue Fox was nominated for the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize and The Whispering Muse received the Icelandic Bookseller’s Prize for Novel of the Year. He frequently collaborates with Björk, including her most recent project Biophilia (2011). Sjón is also the President of the Icelandic PEN Center and the Chairman of the Board of Reykjavík UNESCO City of Literature. He lives in Reykjavík.

About Hari Kunzru

Hari Kunzru is the author of the novels The Impressionist (2002), Transmission (2004), and My Revolutions (2007), as well as a short story collection, Noise (2006). His work has been translated into twenty-one languages and won him prizes including the Somerset Maugham award, the Betty Trask prize of the Society of Authors, and a British Book Award. In 2003 Granta named him one of its twenty best young British novelists. Lire magazine named him one of its 50 “écrivains pour demain.” He is Deputy President of English PEN, a patron of the Refugee Council, and a member of the editorial board of Mute magazine. His short stories and journalism have appeared in diverse publications including The New York Times, Guardian, The New Yorker, Washington Post, Times of India, Wired, and New Statesman. His fourth novel, Gods Without Men was published in August 2011. He lives in New York City.

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Kids and Family

Munch and Warhol: Contemporary Reflections

Saturday, May 11, 3 pm
Free, but RSVP is encouraged

Munch and Warhol: Contemporary ReflectionsAn afternoon conversation with artists discussing Munch’s continuing influence on contemporary artists, with Francesco Clemente and Lisa Yuskavage, moderated by Robert Storr, Yale University School of Art.

Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) gratefully acknowledges the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York for supporting this program.

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Kids and Family

Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction:
Warhol, Munch, and the Multiplied Print
with co-curator Dr. Patricia G. Berman

Monday, June 17, 6:30 pm
Free, but RSVP is encouraged

Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction: Warhol, Munch, and the Multiplied PrintExhibition co-curator Dr. Patricia G. Berman examines Warhol’s After Munch series – the intersection of two print makers, two personae, two ways of understanding print media, and two fundamentally different moments in mass media.

About Dr. Patricia G. Berman

Patricia G. Berman is an art historian specializing in the art and visual culture of the late 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. She is the Theodora L. and Stanley H. Feldberg Professor of Art and Chair of the Art Department at Wellesley College and also teaches at the University of Oslo’s Institute of Philosophy, the History of Ideas, Art History, and Classical Studies, where she is a part of a research project entitled Edvard Munch, Modernity, and Meditation.

Her research interests include turn-of-the-(20th) century European art, especially in Scandinavia, and mid-century modern American painting and photography. Berman is particularly interested in national identity formation, issues of gender and sexuality, and in the problems of public space. Her books include studies of the artists Edvard Munch and James Ensor, and of Danish painting in the 19th century. She has received numerous awards and fellowships, including the Anna and Samuel Pinanski Teaching Prize, Wellesley College (2008) and both a Fulbright Senior Scholar Grant and an American Philosophical Society Fellowship (2006). She is also a two-time Fellow of The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) (1984; 1985) and has been a member of the ASF Committee on Fellowships and Grants since 1992. Berman was named an Advisory Trustee to the ASF in March 2012.

Berman’s curatorial work has included Luminous Modernism: Scandinavian Art Comes to America, A Centennial Retrospective, 1912 (2011, Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation, NY); In Munch’s Laboratory: The Path to the Aula (2011, Munch Museum, Oslo), Edvard Munch and the Modern Life of the Soul (2006, Museum of Modern Art, NY); Cold War Modern: The Domesticated Avant-Garde, 1945 – 1960 (2000-01, Wellesley College); Edvard Munch and Women: Image and Myth (1997, San Diego Museum of Art, Portland Art Museum, Oregon, Columbia, South Carolina, and the Yale University Art Gallery); and Modern Hieroglyphs: Gestural Drawing and the European Vanguard, 1900 – 1918 (1995, Wellesley and the Equitable Collection). Early in her career, she worked closely with Kirk Varnedoe on the landmark exhibition Northern Light: Realism and Symbolism in Scandinavian Painting, 1880 – 1910, which toured the U.S. in 1982-83.

Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) gratefully acknowledges the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York for supporting this program.

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Exhibition

Portraits and Self-Portraits in the Art of Warhol
with Dr. Reva Wolf, SUNY New Paltz

Tuesday, June 25, 6:30 pm
Free, but RSVP is encouraged

Portraits and Self-Portraits in the Art of WarholArt historian Reva Wolf discusses the relationship between portraits and self-portraits, contextualizing and exploring Munch’s Self-Portrait by Warhol.

About Dr. Reva Wolf

Reva Wolf teaches and writes about art of the 18th century to the present. She is the author of two books: Goya and the Satirical Print in England and on the Continent, 1730-1850 (David R. Godine, Publisher, Inc., 1991) and Andy Warhol, Poetry, and Gossip in the 1960s (University of Chicago Press, 1997). Wolf’s recent work focuses on methodology, art and humor, the reception of art, and issues of appropriation and authenticity. She has held fellowships at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harvard University, and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. She was the 2010-11 recipient of the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) gratefully acknowledges the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York for supporting this program.

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Kids and Family

After Munch and Warhol:
Contemporary Reflections II

Thursday, July 18, 6:30 pm
Free, but RSVP is encouraged

After Munch and Warhol

Moderated by exhibition co-curator Pari Stave, curators and artists – including Andrea Kroksnes, Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo; John Ravenal, Sydney and Frances Lewis Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and contemporary Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson – discuss Edvard Munch's influence on art today.

About the participants

Ragnar Kjartansson (b. 1976, Reykjavík) draws on the entire arc of art in his performative practice. The history of film, music, theater, visual culture, and literature finds its way into his video installations, durational performances, drawing, and painting. Pretending and staging become key tools in the artist's attempt to convey sincere emotion and offering a genuine experience to the audience. His playful work is full of unique moments where a conflict of the dramatic and the banal culminates in a memorable way. Kjartansson’s pieces are characterized by the play between contradictory feelings – sorrow and happiness, horror and beauty, drama and humor.

Kjartansson's work has been exhibited widely. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at Luhring Augustine in New York (Ragnar Kjartansson: The Visitors, 2013); the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich (Benefit, 2012), the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin (Ragnar Kjartansson: The End-Venezia, 2012), Frankfurter Kunstverein (Ragnar Kjartansson: Endless Longing, Eternal Return, 2011), and BAWAG Contemporary in Vienna (Take me here by the Dishwasher, 2011). Song, his first American solo museum show, was organized by the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh in 2011, and has since traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami and the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in Boston. Kjartansson was the recipient of Performa’s 2011 Malcolm McLaren Award for his performance of Bliss, a twelve-hour live loop of the final aria of Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro and in 2009 he was the youngest artist to represent Iceland at the Venice Biennale’s International Art Exhibition. He studied at The Icelandic Academy of the Arts (1997 – 2001) and The Royal Academy in Stockholm (2000). The artist lives and works in Reykjavík.

Dr. Andrea Kroksnes (b. 1971) is an art historian, curator, and art critic. She graduated in applied cultural studies at the University of Lüneburg, then studied art history and criticism at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Since autumn 2001 she has been Senior Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Oslo, which now, following the fusion of Oslo’s four largest museums in 2003, forms part of the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design. Besides numerous thematic group exhibitions, Kroksnes has also curated solo exhibitions by international artists such as Thomas Ruff (2002, in collaboration with the Kunsthalle Baden-Baden), Paul McCarthy (2003, together with the Kunstverein in Hamburg), Nick Relph/Oliver Payne (2003–2004, in collaboration with the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris), Rémy Zaugg (2004), Louise Lawler (2005), and Kirstine Roepstorff (2010, with Kunstmuseum Basel). In 2003, Kroksnes co-curated the Nordic Pavillon at Francesco Bonami´s Venice Biennale.

She is currently working on a museum show with artist Ida Ekblad for 2013, preparing a thematic group show on "Democracies" for 2014, and is also co-curating a Louise Bourgeois and Edvard Munch show for 2015 with Nils Ohlsen, Director of the Department of Old Masters and Modern Art at the National Museum in Oslo. Kroksnes has also lectured at the art academies of Oslo and Bergen. In recent years she has published and contributed to a number of catalogues on international artists including Karin Mamma Andersen, Chantal Akerman, Rosa Barba, Kristina Braein, Dan Colen, Tacita Dean, Nathalie Djuberg, Olafur Eliasson, Matias Faldbakken, Marine Hugonnier, Isaac Julien, Lisa Lounila, Olaf Metzel, Alexandra Mir, Helen Mirra, Marjetica Potrc, Lara Schnitger, Robert Smithson, Fiona Tan, Amelie von Wulffen, and Knut Åsdam. As a critic she has written essays for specialist journals and compendia such as Artforum, Kunst og Kultur, Texte zur Kunst, Springerin: Hefte für Gegenwartskunst, Siksi: The Nordic Art Review, Parkett, and NU.

John Ravenal is the Sydney and Frances Lewis Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA). Since joining VMFA in 1998, Ravenal’s exhibitions have included Vanitas: Mediations on Life and Death in Contemporary Art (2000); Outer & Inner Space (2002), a history of video art that received an Emily Hill Tremaine Exhibition Award; Robert Lazzarini’s first solo museum exhibition (2004; recognized by the International Association of Art Critics as one of the year’s best shows); and Artificial Light, displayed at VCUarts Anderson Gallery and the Miami Museum of Contemporary Art during Art Basel Miami Beach (2006). He also authored the book Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (2007).

From 1991 – 1998, Ravenal worked at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where he was Associate Curator of 20th Century Art. His exhibitions there included commissioned projects by Sherrie Levine, Lawrence Weiner, Richard Long, and Rirkrit Tiravanija; a retrospective of paintings and drawings by Sidney Goodman; and the first United States museum exhibition by Scottish artist Ian Hamilton Finlay. Ravenal earned his M.A. and M.Phil. in art history from Columbia University.

Pari Stave is a New York-based freelance curator specializing in contemporary art. She has a B.A. in American history from Rutgers University and art history at the Institute of Fine Arts/ NYU. For the past two years she has worked as a consulting curator to The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF), working closely on the exhibitions Luminous Modernism: Scandinavian Art Comes to America, 1912 (2011 – 12), Unnatural Formations: Three Contemporary Photographers (2012), New Wave Finland: Contemporary Photography from the Helsinki School (2013), and MUNCH | WARHOL and the Multiple Image (2013). Stave is presently curating an exhibition on contemporary Icelandic art and a group exhibition of contemporary artists inspired by the Arctic Circle Project.

Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) gratefully acknowledges the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York for supporting this program.

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Kids and Family

Munch’s Repetition
with Dr. Jay A. Clarke, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

Tuesday, July 23, 6:30 pm
Free, but RSVP is encouraged

Munch's RepetitionEdvard Munch's lifelong use of repetition in his paintings and prints was as much about commerce as it was about neurotic preoccupation. This lecture will investigate how the artist's repeated visual motifs – such as The Scream, Madonna, and The Sick Child – changed and took on new meanings throughout his career.

About Dr. Jay A. Clarke

Dr. Jay A. Clarke is Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute and Lecturer in the Graduate Program in the History of Art at Williams College. From 1997 to 2009 she served as a curator at the Art Institute of Chicago and, from 2001 to 2008, on the part-time faculty of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago's Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism. Her publications include, among others, The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec (2013), Landscape, Innovation, and Nostalgia: The Manton Collection of British Art (Yale University Press, 2012); Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth (Yale University Press, 2009); and several articles on German and Norwegian visual culture and historiography.

Clarke received her Ph.D. from Brown University in 1999 with a dissertation on printmaking and art criticism in Berlin during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. She has received grants from the National Endowment of the Arts, DAAD, Marshall Fund, The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF), and the Ferdinand Möller Stiftung. Among the numerous exhibitions she has curated are: The Strange World of Albrecht Dürer (2010), Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth (2009), and Postwar German Works on Paper: Gifts of Susan and Lewis Manilow (2002).

Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) gratefully acknowledges the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York for supporting this program.

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Reflections on the 70th Anniversary
of the Danish Rescue of the Jews
An Ambassador Edward E. and Susie Elson Lecture
with Bo Lidegaard

Wednesday, September 18, 6 pm
Free, but RSVP required to claire@amscan.org by Monday, September 16, 2013

In this inaugural Ambassador Edward E. and Susie Elson Lecture, Danish historian, journalist, and former diplomat Bo Lidegaard, author of Countrymen (Knopf, 2013), will discuss the extraordinary story of how Denmark saved its Jews from the Nazis in World War II.

With his access to diaries, letters, and family accounts, Lidegaard will focus on how, in 1943, the Danish king, his ministers, and Parliament agreed that no one in Denmark would aid the Nazis in rounding up the 7,000 Danish Jews for deportation and certain death. Over the two-week period of September 26 to October 9, 1943, 6,500 out of the 7,000 Jews escaped to Sweden, having been assisted, hidden, and protected by their fellow countrymen.

The Ambassador Edward E. Elson and Susie Elson Lecture series was created by Edward E. Elson (U.S. Ambassador to Denmark, 1993–1998) to recognize outstanding achievement in the fields of the arts, literature, education, or public service by Danes or Danish Americans.

About Bo Lidegaard

Bo LidegaardBo Lidegaard is the editor-in-chief of the leading Danish newspaper Politiken and the author of several books on modern history. He served as a diplomat in the Danish Foreign Service before joining the Office of the Danish Prime Minister as Ambassador and Permanent Undersecretary of State tasked with responsibilities corresponding to those of National Security Advisor. Lidegaard later led the team preparing the 2009 United Nations conference on climate change in Copenhagen. He is one of the most respected and widely read Danish historians, and his work has focused on U.S.-Danish relations in the twentieth century, as well as on the modern Danish welfare state. Lidegaard lives in Copenhagen.

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Hunting for Hecla:
The Danish-Norwegian Contribution to NYC's Modern Architecture

Monday, October 7, 6:30 pm
This lecture was rescheduled from Monday, May 13, 2013
Free

Norwegian father and son duo, the architect and writer Jan and photographer Are Carlsen, with video director Ninja Benneche, enthusiastically tell the relatively unknown story of Williamsburg-based Hecla Iron Works and its two pioneering founders Carl Michael Eger (Norwegian, 1843 – 1916) and the ASF’s founder Niels Poulson (Danish, 1843 – 1911) during the early 20th century, a vital period of growth for New York City as a modern metropolis developing its modern architectural language.

Amongst their discoveries of buildings that Hecla contributed to are the American Surety Building, Dakota House, B. Altman & Co. Department Store, Macomb´s Dam Bridge and 155th Street Viaduct, Grand Central Station, the New York Stock Exchange, Flatiron Building, Lullwater Bridge, and several original kiosks for the IRT subway system.

Brooklyn BreweryBeer was lovingly provided by Brooklyn Brewery for post-lecture reception.

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A Swedish Literary Icon:
The Writings of Stig Dagerman in America

Tuesday, October 22, 6:30 pm
Free

Stig DagermanStig Dagerman was one of Sweden's most prolific and acclaimed post-war writers. As writer, playwright, and literary critic Graham Greene noted: “Dagerman wrote with beautiful objectivity. Instead of emotive phrases, he uses a choice of facts, like bricks, to construct an emotion.” A literary phenomenon during his brief career, Dagerman died tragically young, but his writing continues to attract new generations of readers around the world. Now, for the first time, his body of work is being published in the United States with four new volumes to date.

Novelist Siri Hustvedt, translator Steven Hartman, and PEN Translation Committee Chair Susan Bernofsky read and discuss Stig Dagerman’s writings with moderator Ann Kjellberg, editor of the literary magazine Little Star. The author's daughter, Lo Dagerman, will introduce a short documentary, Our Need for Consolation (directed by Dan Levy Dagerman, 2012), featuring actor Stellan Skarsgård, and based on Dagerman's classic text of the same name.

Co-presented by the Consulate General of Sweden in New York and PEN American Center, in association with the American Scandinavian Society of New York.

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A Highway Under Siege:
Power, Privacy, and the Internet

Wednesday, October 30, 2 – 5:30 pm & Thursday, October 31, 9:30 am – 3:15 pm
Free, but RSVP required

The Snowden affair, the readiness of the U.S. government to subordinate the privacy of Internet communications to the interests of national security, the accumulation of Internet-based information by private businesses for their own uses – these developments propel Internet technologies and issues surrounding their use to the center of everyday political and civic concerns.

In a two-day conference organized by the New York Review of Books Foundation, in association with Norway’s Fritt Ord Foundation and PEN American Center, these issues and the role of the Internet in corporate management systems (known as “Computer Business Systems”), its role in dissent and repression, with a special focus on China and Russia will be examined. Further topics will be the Internet and the printed press, and the Internet and the future of higher education.

Among those participating will be James Bamford, author specializing in intelligence issues, including the role of the National Security Agency; Robert Darnton, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and Director of the University Library at Harvard; Simon Head, Senior Fellow, the Institute of Public Knowledge, New York University and Director of Programs, the New York Review of Books Foundation; Amy Knight, historian specializing in Russian history and politics; Nicholas Lemann, staff writer, The New Yorker and formerly the Dean of Columbia’s School of Journalism; Perry Link, Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, Riverside; Jeff Madrick, journalist, economic policy consultant and analyst and visiting Professor of Humanities, Cooper Union; Michael Massing, contributing editor, Columbia Journalism Review; and Robert Silvers, editor, The New York Review of Books.

Organized by the New York Review of Books Foundation and co-sponsored by the Fritt Ord Foundation and PEN American Center, with the generous support of Sara and Landon Rowland and the Lead Bank of Kansas City, and of The Europaeum of Oxford.

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Past and Future in the Art of Vilhelm Hammershøi
with co-curator Dr. Thor J. Mednick

Tuesday, November 5, 6:30 pm
Free

Past and Future in the Art of Vilhelm HammershoiVilhelm Hammershøi occupies a central position in Denmark’s transition to modernism in art. Through his paintings, he managed a remarkable paradox, paying respectful tribute to his historical sources while at the same time undermining them in an insightful and modern way. While they recall the meticulous elegance of the Dutch and Danish Golden Ages, Hammershøi’s works also signal the end of these traditions and the emergence of a new paradigm of artistic representation.

About Dr. Thor J. Mednick

Dr. Thor J. Mednick, former Fellow of the ASF and the Ambassador John L. Loeb Jr. Foundation, is Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Toledo. A recognized scholar of 19th century art and an expert on turn-of-the-century art in Denmark, he has published on Peder Severin Krøyer and the artists’ colony in Skagen, Denmark, and is currently preparing a publication on the work of Vilhelm Hammershøi.

Exhibition-related educational programs have been supported in part by a grant from the Robert Lehman Foundation.

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Membership

The Current State of the UN and the Challenges It Is Facing
A Curtis L. Carlson Lecture with Jan Eliasson

Tuesday, November 12, 5 pm
RSVP required and accepted on a first-come, first served basis.
Please RSVP by Thursday, November 7 to claire@amscan.org or 212.847.9725

The Curtis L. Carlson Distinguished Lecture Series was created by the Carlson Family Foundation to support public discourse on issues and topics of particular relevance to the people of the United States and the Nordic nations.

About Jan Eliasson

Jan Eliasson H.E. Mr. Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations, was born in Gothenburg, Sweden. He graduated from the Swedish Naval Academy in 1962 and earned a Master's degree in Economics and Business Administration in 1965.

From 2007 to 2008, Mr. Eliasson served as the Special Envoy of the UN Secretary-General for Darfur. Prior to this, he served as President of the 60th session of the UN General Assembly and as Sweden's Ambassador to the US from September 2000 until July 2005. In March 2006, Mr. Eliasson was appointed Foreign Minister of Sweden and served in this capacity until the elections in the fall of 2006.

Mr. Eliasson served, from 1994 to 2000, as Sweden's State Secretary for Foreign Affairs, a key position in formulating and implementing Swedish foreign policy. He was Sweden's Ambassador to the United Nations from 1988 to 1992, and also served as the Secretary-General's Personal Representative for Iran/Iraq.

Mr. Eliasson was the first UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and was involved in operations in Africa and the Balkans. He took initiatives on landmines, conflict prevention, and humanitarian action. From 1980 to 1986, Mr. Eliasson was part of the UN mediation missions in the war between Iran and Iraq, headed by former Prime Minister Olof Palme. In 1993 to 1994, he served as mediator in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE).

Prior to his appointment as Deputy Secretary-General, Jan Eliasson also served as Chair of Water Aid/Sweden and a member of the UN Secretary-General's Advocacy Group of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The Golden Age of Danish Painting
with Dr. Kasper Monrad and Dr. Jørgen Wadum, National Gallery of Denmark

Monday, December 2, 6:30 pm
Free

The Golden Age of Danish PaintingPainting of the so-called Golden Age (1800-50) is a highlight in Danish art, and over the last few decades Golden Age painters like C.W. Eckersberg, Christen Købke, and J. Th. Lundbye have gained increased recognition in the U.S., as art museums and galleries like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago have acquired a number of their important works. Dr. Kasper Monrad, Chief Curator at the National Gallery of Denmark (Statens Museum for Kunst), discusses the rise of the first Copenhagen-based school of painting and Danish painters' turn toward subjects of everyday life and the study of nature.

Dr. Jørgen Wadum, Director of Conservation at the National Gallery of Denmark, will present the latest insights into the Golden Age artists' techniques and processes which have been informed by preparatory drawings under painted canvases as revealed by infrared photography.

About Dr. Kasper Monrad

Dr. Kasper Monrad, Chief Curator at the National Gallery of Denmark (Statens Museum for Kunst) in Copenhagen, is a specialist in Danish and European painting of the 19th century. He has written several books and curated exhibitions on artists like C.W. Eckersberg, Christen Købke, and Vilhelm Hammershøi. Dr. Monrad was the Danish curator of the 1992-93 exhibition The Golden Age of Danish Painting at LACMA and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He has given lectures at several American art museums and universities.

About Dr. Jørgen Wadum

Professor Dr. Jørgen Wadum is Director of Conservation at the National Gallery of Denmark (Statens Museum for Kunst) and Director of the Centre for Art Technological Studies and Conservation (CATS). He trained as a flower painter, an art historian, and as a paintings conservator. From 1990 to 2004 he was Chief Conservator at the Mauritshuis, The Hague. Wadum has published and lectured extensively internationally on a multitude of subjects related to technical art history and other issues of importance for the understanding and keeping of our cultural heritage.

Exhibition-related educational programs have been supported in part by a grant from the Robert Lehman Foundation.

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Copenhagen and Vanguard Europe
with co-curator Dr. Patricia G. Berman

Monday, January 13, 2014, 6:30 pm
Free

Copenhagen and Vanguard EuropeWhile Copenhagen does not figure into traditional histories of modern art in Europe, it was a center of activity for members of Europe's avant-garde in the 1890s. The formation of Den Frie Udstilling/The Free Exhibition (1891), national ambitions, and the presence of Mette Gad Gauguin, among other factors, placed Copenhagen in a privileged position among European art centers. Exhibition co-curator Dr. Patricia G. Berman will explore the relationships among several artists represented in the Loeb Collection to, and within, these phenomena.

About Dr. Patricia G. Berman

Patricia G. Berman is an art historian specializing in the art and visual culture of the late 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. She is the Theodora L. and Stanley H. Feldberg Professor of Art and Chair of the Art Department at Wellesley College and also teaches at the University of Oslo’s Institute of Philosophy, the History of Ideas, Art History, and Classical Studies, where she is a part of a research project entitled Edvard Munch, Modernity, and Meditation.

Her research interests include turn-of-the-(20th) century European art, especially in Scandinavia, and mid-century modern American painting and photography. Berman is particularly interested in national identity formation, issues of gender and sexuality, and in the problems of public space. Her books include studies of the artists Edvard Munch and James Ensor, and of Danish painting in the 19th century. She has received numerous awards and fellowships, including the Anna and Samuel Pinanski Teaching Prize, Wellesley College (2008) and both a Fulbright Senior Scholar Grant and an American Philosophical Society Fellowship (2006). She is also a two-time Fellow of The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) (1984; 1985) and has been a member of the ASF Committee on Fellowships and Grants since 1992. Berman was named an Advisory Trustee to the ASF in March 2012.

Berman’s curatorial work includes MUNCH | WARHOL and the Multiple Image (2013, Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation); Luminous Modernism: Scandinavian Art Comes to America, A Centennial Retrospective, 1912 (2011, Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation, NY); In Munch’s Laboratory: The Path to the Aula (2011, Munch Museum, Oslo), Edvard Munch and the Modern Life of the Soul (2006, Museum of Modern Art, NY); Cold War Modern: The Domesticated Avant-Garde, 1945 – 1960 (2000-01, Wellesley College); Edvard Munch and Women: Image and Myth (1997, San Diego Museum of Art, Portland Art Museum, Oregon, Columbia, South Carolina, and the Yale University Art Gallery); and Modern Hieroglyphs: Gestural Drawing and the European Vanguard, 1900 – 1918 (1995, Wellesley and the Equitable Collection). Early in her career, she worked closely with Kirk Varnedoe on the landmark exhibition Northern Light: Realism and Symbolism in Scandinavian Painting, 1880 – 1910, which toured the U.S. in 1982-83.

Exhibition-related educational programs have been supported in part by a grant from the Robert Lehman Foundation.

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2012

Collecting the Swedish Landscape Then & Now:
A Conversation with Michelle Facos & David Werner

Thursday, January 12, 2012, 6:30 pm
$10 ($7 ASF Members)

Art in Finland, Lecture by Janet RauscherFocusing on Swedish paintings in Luminous Modernism, scholar Michelle Facos and collector David Werner will discuss the role played by landscape painting in forging a collective Swedish identity circa 1900 and the appeal of Swedish landscape painting for collectors then and now.

Michelle Facos is Professor of the History of Art at Indiana University, Bloomington. She is an internationally-recognized expert on Swedish painting and has taught Scandinavian art at Växjö University and Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University in Greifswald, Germany. A contributor to the Luminous Modernism catalogue, her book Nationalism and the Nordic Imagination: Swedish Art of the 1890s (1998) investigates Swedish nature, nationalism, and art in the years around 1900, and her books Symbolist Art in Context (2009) and An Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art (2011) incorporate Scandinavian art into mainstream European movements.

David Werner is a practicing ophthalmologist with a sub specialty in pediatric ophthalmology. He has been a collector of Scandinavian art for the last fifteen years with an emphasis on both the decorative and fine arts from 1880 to 1920. He is president of the advisory board for the Palmer Museum of Art in State College, Pennsylvania and is on the board of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has also lectured on Scandinavian art for Crystal Cruises.

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Art in Finland, 1912
Lecture by Janet Rauscher, Princeton University Art Museum

Thursday, January 19, 2012, 6:30 pm
$10 ($7 ASF Members)

Art in Finland, Lecture by Janet RauscherJoin Janet Rauscher for a fascinating investigation of the dynamic art world and birth of modernism in Finland in the first decades of the 20th century. Rauscher has served as an Editor at the High Museum of Art, Chief Curator of the Nordic Heritage Museum and Associate Instructor at Indiana University at Bloomington. She is currently an Associate Editor at the Princeton University Art Museum.

Universal Truths and Local Fictions: Nordic Art on the Edge
Lecture by Curator Dr. Patricia Berman

Thursday, January 26, 2012, 6:30 pm
$10 ($7 ASF Members)

Focusing on selected works in the Luminous Modernism exhibition, this lecture will explore the tensions between internationalism and national and regional identities that characterized Nordic art at the turn of last century.

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The Glitter Scene
Monika Fagerholm in Conversation with Michael A. Orthofer

Tuesday, February 7, 6:30 pm
Free

The Glitter Scene, Monika FagerholmTeenage Johanna lives with her aunt Solveig in a small house bordering the forest on the outskirts of a remote coastal town in Finland. She leads a lonely existence that is punctuated by visits to her privileged classmate, Ulla Bäckström, who lives in the nearby luxury gated community. It isn’t until Ulla tells her the local lore about the American girl and the tragedy that took place more than thirty years before that Johanna begins to question how her parents fit into the story. She sets out to unravel her family history, the identity of her mother, and the dark secrets long buried with her father. In the process of opening closed doors, others in the community reflect back on the town’s history, on their youth, and on the dreams that play in their minds. Soon a new story emerges, that stirs up Johanna’s greatest fears, but ultimately leads to the answers she is searching for. The Glitter Scene is a riveting mystery that explores the roles of truth and myth, reality and fiction, and the repercussions of family secrets.

The Glitter Scene, Monika FagerholmAbout the author:
Monika Fagerholm’s much-praised first novel, Wonderful Women by the Sea became one of the most widely translated Scandinavian literary novels in the mid-nineties and was nominated for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. In 1998 it was followed by the cult novel Diva, which won the Swedish Literature Society Award. Her third novel, The American Girl, became a number-one best seller and won the premier literary award in Sweden, the August Prize, as well as the Aniara Prize and the Gothenburg Post Award.

About the moderator:
Michael A. Orthofer (b. 1964, Austria) is the founder, managing editor, and principal reviewer of complete review, a literary website founded in March 1999. His work has been praised by David Orr of the New York Times Book Review and by Time magazine. Orthofer has a particular interest in work in translation.

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Regional Modernism: New Art in Scandinavia, 1880-1912
A Symposium on Early Modern Nordic Art

Saturday, February 11, 2012
9:30 am – 6 pm (Registration opens @ 9 am); 2 sessions: 9:30 am – 1 pm & 2:30 pm – 6 pm
$40 ($20/session); $24 ($12/session) ASF Members & Students with a valid ID

Luminous ModernismThe American-Scandinavian Foundation’s third and final centennial exhibition, Luminous Modernism: Scandinavian Art Comes to America, 1912 will culminate in a major, all-day symposium in February 2012. The program, Regional Modernism: New Art in Scandinavia, 1880-1912, will offer audiences an in-depth look at the art, history, and cultural relations of the Scandinavian countries during the dynamic decades of the early 20th century.

The symposium is composed of two featured keynote addresses, a series of short individual presentations by experts from each participating country, and two panel conversations, followed by a light reception. Presenters will explore the ways in which the distinct, regional modernism of the Nordic countries communicated with the rest of continental Europe at the turn-of-the-century and how it came to influence North America’s own modern artists following their exposure to the 1912 Exhibition of Scandinavian Art. The engaging program will present expert insight on the careers of well-known early modern masters including Anders Zorn, Edvard Munch, and Vilhelm Hammershøi, as well as advanced research on the ways in which Scandinavian modernism relates to the work of North American artists such as Marsden Hartley, Canada’s Group of Seven, and the notorious Stieglitz Circle. It will also engage related topics including the history of taste in the United States, women artists in Scandinavia, changes in ethnic identity, and questions on the origins of modernism.

The impressive roster of participating speakers includes independent scholars, museum directors, curators, art history professors, and private collectors from Scandinavia, Canada, and the United States, including many lenders to the exhibition.

For further information on the symposium schedule, participants, and talks please click here.

This symposium was made possible by a grant from the Nordic Culture Fund.
Norden

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Newly Drawn: Emerging Finnish Architects

Tuesday, February 14 & March 14 , 7 pm
Each $10 ($7 ASF Members)

Newly Drawn introduces the most interesting young, upcoming Finnish architects, their latest projects, and ways of working. Touring the world since 2009, the project consists of publications, exhibitions, film screenings, lectures, and workshops.

The series of architectural lectures, panels, and discussions will be held in New York in spring 2012 and will be accompanied by an exhibition opening at the Center for Architecture on April 21, 2012.

Finnish Architecture in Norway: Kilden Performing Arts Centre
with Architect Juho Grönholm

February 14

Finnish Architecture in Norway: Kilden Performing Arts CentreKilden, a theater and concert hall in Kristiansand, Norway, opened in January 2012 and has brought together all the city’s institutions of performing arts, including Agder Theatre, Kristiansand Symphony Orchestra (KSO), and Opera Sør. The landmark was Finnish architecture firm ALA Architects’ first major project. The complex contains four performance venues with a total of 2,300 seats, world-class acoustics and architecture design for a symphony orchestra. The theater and opera hall is adjusts from an intimate drama venue to a lavish opera and musical auditorium.

The building is also an architectural landmark: the sculptural drama of the curving, wooden foyer wall has become an emblem for the city of Kristiansand. Kilden is a meeting place and a source of pride for the locals.

About the architect:
Juho Grönholm is co-founder of ALA, a Helsinki-based architecture firm seeking fresh angles, flowing forms and surprising solutions on all levels of architecture.

Through ALA’s work, particularly Kilden Performing Arts Centre, Grönholm has gained a reputation as an architect driven by a strong belief in rich, experiential architecture. His solid pre-ALA background in large, prestigious public building projects has secured his reputation as one of the most proficient amongst any talented young architects today.

Grönholm has lectured about architecture in schools and institutions around the world. He has taught at the Helsinki University of Technology since his graduation from its School of Architecture in 2001. His work has been awarded and published globally. He was awarded the Raili and Reima Pietilä in 2008.

Currently Grönholm holds a teaching position in the Public Building Design Chair at the Aalto University School of Architecture, and regularly lectures elsewhere.

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Anttinen Oiva Architects: Recent Works

March 14

Anttinen Oiva Architects: Recent WorksVesa Oiva, architect and co-founder of Anttinen Oiva Architects speaks about recent and current projects at the firm, including the Helsinki University Library, City Centre Campus Library, Kaisa Branch, which upon completion in spring 2012, will be the largest academic library in Finland.

About the firm:
Selina Anttinen and Vesa Oiva founded Anttinen Oiva Architects in 2006. The office works extensively with both building design and urban planning. Presently ten architects are employed in the office, based in Helsinki.

The office was founded after winning architectural competitions. The works in progress include: a new residential area in the former garrison area of Poltinaho in Hämeenlinna; as well as a winter swimming center in Rovaniemi. Common to the design of all these schemes is the desire for an ambitious, exciting, and versatile contemporary architecture derived from a demanding context. The objective is to create unique and sustainable environments.

Presented by the Newly Drawn project, the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York, the Consulate General of Finland in New York, the Architectural League of New York, the AIA New York Chapter, and Scandinavia House.

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Fifth Nordic Investment Bank Economic Symposium and Reception
Economic Trends into the Coming Century

Thursday, February 16, 5:30 pm
Reservations are required. Please contact claire@amscan.org or 212.847.9725
Business attire; cocktail reception to follow

Fifth Nordic Investment Bank Economic Symposium and Reception

The symposium explores and promotes the bonds between the Nordic countries and the United States by presenting distinguished speakers from Nordic and the United States by presenting distinguished speakers from Nordic and American financial, business, government, and academic communities.

American Scandinavian FoundationEconomic Trends into the Coming Century features a panel of speakers including Orri Hauksson, Director General, Federation of Icelandic Industries; Edmund S. Phelps, McVickar Professor Political Economy and Director of the Center on Capitalism & Society, Columbia University; 2006 Nobel Prize Winner in Economics; Hyun Song Shin, Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics, Princeton University; and is moderated by Johnny Åkerholm, President and CEO, Nordic Investment Bank. Additional speakers to be announced.

The Nordic Investment Bank (NIB) Economic Symposium at Scandinavia House is supported by a generous grant from the Nordic Investment Bank, given to The American-Scandinavian Foundation in June 2001 to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the NIB.

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Northern Influences: Americans Look at Great Nordic Writers
Selma Lagerlöf’s The Saga of Gösta Berling

Monday, February 27, 6:30 pm
Free

Northern Influences: Americans Look at Great Nordic Writers: Selma Lagerlöf’s The Saga of Gösta BerlingThis spring presents a continuation of a series of panel discussions begun in early 2011 that emphasize the influence of Nordic literature. American authors, dramatists, critics, and their guests discuss giants of Nordic literature. Rooted in dramatic readings, reflections, and lively discussion, these literary evenings allow readers of today a new window into the lives and characters behind the work of a spectrum of Nordic literary geniuses.

A book program that celebrates Selma Lagerlöf’s 1891 romantic novel The Saga of Gösta Berling, the Swedish Gone with the Wind, with translator 2004 ASF Translation Prize Winner Paul Norlen and Former ASF Fellow and Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Jennifer Watson, and including readings from the novel by actors Lisa Pettersson, Alexandra Gjerpen, and Heli Sirviö.

Presented in association with the Consulate General of Sweden in New York and The American Scandinavian Society of New York.

This literary program coincides with the opening of 50 Years of the Nordic Council Literature Prize.

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Greenland icon The Tale of the Uummannaq

Thursday, March 1, 6:30 pm
Free

Photos by Galya Morrell

The Tale of Uummannaq and Ajajajaja - Galya Morrell’s short documentary and photo-exhibit convey the story of Uummannaq, an isolated village in Northern Greenland at risk of disappearing. A unique project was started there three years ago as a collaboration between local hunters and international artists in order to bridge the island’s geographical isolation and give this village a second chance. Co-founders of Uummannaq Music, Joel Spiegelman, Galya Morrell, and Ole Jorgen Hammeken, get together to talk about the revival of Ajajajaja, a combination of music, storytelling, and unique Greenlandic historical values.

This program is presented in conjunction with a week of special Greenlandic programs (view all programs).

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Authors in Conversation:
Yrsa Sigurðardóttir & Elizabeth Hand

Tuesday, March 27, 6:30 pm
Free

Authors in Conversation:
Yrsa Sigurðardóttir & Elizabeth HandIcelandic crime author Yrsa Sigurðardóttir joins American writer Elizabeth Hand in a conversation about their work, the current Scandinavian crime fiction renaissance, what drew them to the genre, and ideas for future Iceland-related crime stories.

Yrsa Sigurðardóttir debuted as a crime writer in 2005 with Last Rituals/Þriðja táknið, which so far has been translated into more than 30 languages. Her second crime novel about attorney Thóra Gudmundsdóttir, My Soul to Take/Sér grefur gröf, was published in 2006. It is already sold in 14 countries, including in the U.S., U.K., Germany, Italy, Greece, Poland, Spain, and Scandinavia. Sigurðardóttir's third crime novel, Ashes to Dust/Aska was published in 2007 and was a huge success. In 2008, her fourth crime novel, The Day is Dark/Auðin, sold more than 10,000 copies in hardcover in Iceland in only six weeks. Look at Me/Horfðu á mig (2009) was also a success, but in 2010 she broke her previous records when her novel Blessed are the Children/Ég man þig sold 16,000 copies in six weeks.

Sigurðardóttir previously wrote 5 novels for children and pre-teens, two of which have won Icelandic prizes for literature: the IBBY Award (2000) and the Icelandic Children's Book Award (2003). All of them are exciting and entertaining tales, bursting with humor and the joy of storytelling.

She is married with two kids and leads two different lives; as a crime writer and a civil engineer.

Authors in Conversation:
Yrsa Sigurðardóttir & Elizabeth HandElizabeth Hand is the multiple-award-winning author of eleven novels and three collections of short fiction, including Available Dark, sequel to her Shirley Jackson Award-winner Generation Loss. She is also a longtime critic and contributor to numerous publications, including The Washington Post, Salon, The Los Angeles Times, Village Voice, and DownEast magazine, among others. She divides her time between the coast of Maine and North London, and is at work on the third Cass Neary thriller, Flash Burn.

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Easy Money
Jens Lapidus

Monday, April 9, 6:30 pm
Free

Easy MoneyStockholm’s underworld, told from the perspective of the mob bosses, the patsies, and the thugs who help operate its twisted justice system.

JW is a student having trouble keeping up appearances in the rich party crowd he has involved himself with. He’s desperate for money, and when he’s offered a job dealing drugs to the very crowd he’s vying for a place in, he accepts it. Meanwhile, Jorge, a young Latino drug dealer, has just broken out of jail and is itching for revenge. When JW’s supplier gets wind of Jorge’s escape, he suggests JW track him down and attempt to win his trust in order to cover more area in the drug circuit. But JW’s not the only one on Jorge’s trail: Mrado, the brutal muscle behind the Yugoslavian mob boss whose goons were the ones who ratted Jorge out to the cops, is also on the hunt. But like everyone else, he’s tired of being a mere pawn in an impossibly risky game, and he’s seeking to carve out a niche of his own. As the paths of these antiheroes intertwine further, they find themselves mercilessly pitted against one another in a world where allegiances are hard-won, revenge is hard-fought, and a way out of it all is even harder to come by.

Fast and intricately paced, and with pitch-perfect dialogue, Easy Money is a raw, dark, and intelligent crime novel that has catapulted Jens Lapidus into the company of Sweden’s most acclaimed crime writers. It is the first of The Stockholm Noir Trilogy, which also includes Aldrig Fucka Upp (Wahlström & Widstrand, 2008).

Easy MoneyAbout the author:
Jens Lapidus is a criminal defense lawyer who represents some of Sweden’s most notorious underworld criminals. He made his writing debut in August 2006 with Easy Money, the first installment of The Stockholm Noir Trilogy. Lapidus lives in Stockholm with his wife.

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From Neutral Voice to Active Partner: Sweden’s Changing Role in World Politics
and its Relationship to the U.S.
ASF Visiting Lecturer Jan Joel Andersson

Monday, April 16, 6:30 pm
Free

Sweden’s foreign and security policies underwent dramatic transformations following the end of the Cold War. ASF Visiting Lecturer and Swedish Institute of International Affairs Senior Research Fellow Jan Joel Andersson draws upon his research to examine Sweden’s evolving role in world politics. From being a neutral country that emphasized contributions to the U.N. peacekeeping missions, today Sweden is an extraordinarily close partner to N.A.T.O and the U.S. in areas such as Afghanistan and the Balkans, and together with Norway and Denmark, was among the few European countries that contributed military assets in the N.A.T.O-led campaign in Libya this past summer.

From Neutral Voice to Active Partner: Sweden’s Changing Role in World Politics 
and its Relationship to the U.S., ASF Visiting Lecturer Jan Joel AnderssonAbout the ASF Visiting Lecturer:
Dr. Jan Joel Andersson is Senior Research Fellow at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs (UI). He is Head of UI's program on Defense, Security, and Development Policy. After completing his PhD at the University of California at Berkeley in December 2002, Dr. Andersson joined UI as a Research Fellow focusing on European and Transatlantic security and defense. He served as UI's Program Director in charge of the Institute's seminars, conferences, and external relations between August 2006 and September 2010 while concurrently serving as Head of UI's Transatlantic Program. Dr. Andersson has previously taught International Relations at Berkeley, Stockholm, and Uppsala; has served as Senior Analyst and consultant at the risk management firm 4C Strategies AB; has been a visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Security Studies in Paris (EU-ISS), and worked on the staff of a U.S. Senator on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

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Stieg Larsson and Me
Book Talk with Eva Gabrielsson

Tuesday, May 29, 6:30 pm
Free

There Are Things I Want You to Know About Stieg Larsson and Me : Book Cover There is only one person who can tell Stieg Larsson’s story other than himself, and that is his lifelong companion Eva Gabrielsson. There Are Things I Want You to Know About Stieg Larsson and Me is her book.

The keys to the "Stieg Larsson phenomenon" all lie with Stieg Larsson the man. No one knew him like his Gabrielsson. Here she tells the story of their 30-year romance, of Stieg’s life-long struggle to expose Sweden’s Neo-Nazis, of his struggle to keep the magazine he founded, Expo, alive, his difficult relationships with his immediate family, and the joy and relief he discovered writing the Millennium Trilogy. Above all, this is a love story, and we come to understand, reading There Are Things I Want You to Know About Stieg Larsson and Me, that if there was another secret besides Larsson’s own imagination and convictions, it was his absolute love for his companion and her nurturing of their privacy and shared passions.

There Are Things I Want You to Know is told as a series of short vignettes, with titles ranging from "Speaking of Coffee," and "Stieg’s Journalistic Credo," to "Goodbyes," and "The Fourth Volume." She speaks with rare candor and dignity, inspired only by the truth as she knows it. The book is thus short and to the point, poignant in its account of two soul mates and the life they shared, deeply insightful into the man everyone wants to know better, about whom so little is known.

"I would have preferred to have never written this book. It speaks of Stieg, of our life together, and of my life after his death," writes Gabrielsson early in her book. It was written because she alone can tell this story.

An international bestseller, There Are Things I Want You to Know About Stieg Larsson and Me has been featured on The Today Show (June 2011), in Vanity Fair (July 2011), The New York Times (July 2011), on National Public Radio (June 2011), and in many other places. The paperback edition is now available, which Ms. Gabrielsson will be happy to sign at the end of the program. The book will be for sale at Scandinavia House and is also available through Seven Stories Press, Amazon, and many other retailers.

Eva Gabrielsson About the author:
Eva Gabrielsson is an architect, author and political activist. Currently her architectural practice includes housing and office construction and heading a European Union initiative to create sustainable architecture in the Dalecarlia region. As an author, in addition to working with Stieg Larsson on his writing projects, she is the coauthor of several books, including a monograph on the subject of cohabitation in Sweden, a Swedish government study on how to create more sustainable housing, and a forthcoming study on the Swedish urban planner Per Olof Hallman. She has also translated into Swedish Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle. As an activist, she works to stop violence against women. In 2010 she served as a consultant on a Danish adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by the Nørrebro Theatre Company.

Eva Gabrielsson and Stieg Larsson met in 1972, when they were both eighteen, and lived and wrote together from 1974 until his death in 2004. Their struggle together for social justice was the basis for the books in Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy.

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Barriers to Health Care for Mental Illness in Poor Countries
ASF Visiting Lecturer Lena Andersson

Tuesday, October 2, 6:30 pm
Free

Barriers to Health Care for Mental Illness in Poor Countries, ASF Visiting Lecturer Lena AnderssonMental health in low income countries has received little attention in development assistance and research over the years. Mental illness affects all levels of society (individual, family, neighborhood, and national levels) and must, especially in poor countries, be addressed in order to reduce poverty, and to improve equity and human rights. ASF Visiting Lecturer Lena Andersson, University of Gothenburg, will present an ongoing research project in South Africa as the basis of her talk on bettering health care for people with mental illnesses in poor countries through the promotion of the right to health and better understanding of help-seeking behaviors.

About Lena Andersson:
Lena Andersson (b. 1965) has a Ph.D. in Social Medicine (2006) and an M. Sc.in Structural Social Work (2001) from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

She is working at the unit of Social Medicine at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and is lecturing on various subjects in public health, social medicine, and global health. Andersson is also working with international mobility of students and teachers and collaborates with several non-governmental organizations in low and middle income countries concerning internship. She has also been lecturing abroad at universities in South Africa, Pakistan, and Vietnam and collaborates with colleagues at the School of Public Health at the University of Albany.

Her thesis concerned geographical differences in disability pension and sickness absence due to psychiatric disorders. Her current research concerns mental health, suicide, help seeking behavior, barriers to care, the right to health, global health, and social inequalities in health. Andersson is the principal investigator for a research project on mental illness and barriers to care in South Africa (financed by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency) and a co-worker in projects concerning traumatic experiences and mental health in Rwanda, improving birth weight in Sri Lanka, and health system development in Sub-Sahara, Africa.

Andersson is a member of the board for the Swedish Association of Social Medicine, Vice President in the Public Mental Health section in the European Public Health Association (EUPHA), and member of the research group Global Health at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

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A Voyage around the North Pole: Modern Exploration and Climate Change
Thorleif Thorleifsson

Thursday, October 4, 7:30 pm
Free

A Voyage around the North Pole: Modern Exploration and Climate Change, Thorleif ThorleifssonChanges to the environment and climate of the Arctic are offering new opportunities for both competition and collaboration among the states on its periphery. Dynamism in the region will only increase in the coming decades, as water levels rise, gas and oil reserves are explored, and territorial claims are challenged. How do we successfully navigate the Arctic challenges of tomorrow?

Thorleif Thorleifsson, Norwegian arctic mariner, will assess the state of the actual physical environment in the Arctic and its impact on the strategic environment. He will talk about his 2010 record breaking voyage around the Arctic, and the challenges and environmental changes encountered along the way, as well as the Norwegian history of Arctic exploration and explorers of the past.

Environmental Counselor, Royal Norwegian Embassy, Mari Archer Sæther will speak briefly about environmental change and introduce Thorleifsson.

A Q & A will follow the lecture.

About Thorleif Thorleifsson:
Thorleif Thorleifsson is a mariner and an organizational developer. His ideas and perspectives are based on his own experiences from business, organizational development, submarine operations and sailing expeditions into the Arctic, North Atlantic, and Norwegian Sea.

In 2010 Thorleifsson and Børge Ousland became the first to sail around the Arctic in one, short season. A voyage through the Northern Sea route in Russia, the Northwest Passage in Canada and across the North Atlantic back to Norway. A race against time and in waters with drilling ice, increasing darkness and autumn gales. They succeeded due to emphasis on innovation, use of state‐of‐the-art communication technology, good teamwork and combinations of thorough preparation and improvisation.

About Mari Archer Sæther:
Mari Sæther is environment counselor at the Norwegian Embassy in Washington D.C. Mrs. Sæther has worked in the environment field for more than 20 years; in the Norwegian Ministry of the Environment, the European Commission in Brussels and in postings for the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She has also worked on international trade issues for the Norwegian Ministry of Agriculture. She has a M.Sc. from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

Sponsored by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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Exhibition Icon In Search of First Contact: The Vikings of Vinland
Lecture by Professor Annette Kolodny

Tuesday, October 9, 6:30 pm
Free

In Search of First Contact: The Vikings of Vinland, Lecture by Professor Annette KolodnyThe Vinland sagas are the earliest known narratives of first contact between Europeans and the native peoples of North America, and thus are a crucial archive of both Nordic and Native American history. After a decade of working with the Eastern Algonquian-speaking peoples of the Canadian Maritime Provinces and northern New England, award-winning American Studies scholar Annette Kolodny has uncovered the Native American side of the Vinland story. In her latest book, In Search of First Contact: The Vikings of Vinland, the Peoples of the Dawnland, and the Anglo-American Anxiety of Discovery (2012), Professor Kolodny rereads the sagas through the eyes of both the native peoples of Vinland and the Norse colonists. With an acute literary understanding of the sagas, Professor Kolodny additionally unravels episodes in the sagas whose meanings have baffled previous generations of scholars.

About Annette Kolodny:
Professor Kolodny was formerly Dean of the College of Humanities at the University of Arizona and is currently College of Humanities Professor Emerita of American Literature and Culture at that institution. She first studied the corpus of Icelandic sagas at the University of Oslo in Norway in 1961. In 1969, she earned a Ph.D. in American Literature and Interdisciplinary American Studies from the University of California at Berkeley. Before being recruited as the first woman academic dean by the University of Arizona in 1988, she had been a faculty member and taught at Yale University, the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Maryland, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute where she introduced women’s studies and developed a wide range of innovative new courses in the humanities. Following several invited lectures at universities in Norway and several conference presentations in that country, in 1993 Professor Kolodny was elected to lifetime membership in the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. Her many books and articles have been translated and circulated worldwide. Her most recent book, published this summer by Duke University Press, is In Search of First Contact: The Vikings of Vinland, the Peoples of the Dawnland, and the Anglo-American Anxiety of Discovery. One early reviewer has commented that “her exposition of the sagas is absolutely superb,” and another reviewer has predicted that “this brilliantly written book is bound to become a classic.”

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Film Icon Just a Tiny Piece of Freedom
ICORN (International Cities of Refuge Network)

Monday, October 22, 7 pm
Free

Just a Tiny Piece of Freedom, ICORN (International Cities of Refuge Network)

Within the frames of “The Shahrazad – stories for life” project, initiated 5 years ago to promote ICORN (International Cities of Refuge Network) and its guest writers, a memorable program celebrating freedom of expression and exploring the potentials of spreading the city of asylum/city of refuge idea further into the Americas.

Silence or Exile, a documentary film by Marion Stalens, takes an intimate look at the lives of five exiled writers who, in their pursuit of freedom of speech, have been forced to escape their home countries and build a life from scratch in their new host countries. Through these writers, the film tells a story of a violent, absurd and unjust world. Four of the five writers profiled in the documentary have strong ties to the ICORN network, and two of the authors – Philo Ikonya and Mana Neyestani – are current guest writers in Oslo and Paris respectively. The other writers include Horacio Castellanos Moya (El Salvador/Iowa City), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus/Stockholm), and Ma Jian (China/London).

Acclaimed author Anna Funder goes into her novel All That I Am (2012) and into depth about persecuted writers and intellectuals during the Weimar era and during World War II. Funder is engaged in the work of ICORN and will speak about responsibilities and challenges to mobilize solidarity and hospitality towards persecuted writers of today’s world.

Yu Jie is the recipient of the 2012 Civil Courage Prize. He is known as one of China’s most prominent essayists and critics. Following severe harassment and persecution he fled to the US with his family in January 2012. From his new point of exile, he sees “his lifelong goal as achieving democracy and freedom in China.”

About ICORN
ICORN is an independent international organization of member cities and regions, offering safe havens for persecuted writers; advancing freedom of expression, defending democratic values, and promoting international solidarity. Currently counting 40 member cities in Europe and beyond, ICORN unites its member cities and guest writers in a global network of creativity, solidarity, and mutual interaction. For more information about ICORN, please visit www.icorn.org.

The event is organized by ICORN, the International Cities of Refuge Network and its Shahrazad – stories for life program, in close cooperation with PEN American Center and Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America.

Exhibition Icon The Sagas of Icelanders
Curtis L. Carlson Lecture with Jane Smiley

Tuesday, November 13, 8:30 pm
Free

The Sagas of Iceland, Curtis L. Carlson Lecture with Jane SmileyPulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jane Smiley considers The Sagas of Icelanders through the eyes of a contemporary writer and reflects on their relevance for 21st century readers. Smiley is the author of The Greenlanders and contributed the preface to the recent Penguin Classics edition of The Sagas of Icelanders.

The Curtis L. Carlson Distinguished Lecture series was created by the Carlson Family Foundation to support public discourse on issues and topics of particular relevance to the people of the United States and the Nordic nations.

About Jane Smiley:
Jane Smiley is the author of numerous novels for adults and young adults, including The Age of Grief, The Greenlanders, A Thousand Acres (which won the Pulitzer Prize) Moo, Horse Heaven, and most recently Private Life. She has written many essays for such magazines as Vogue, The New Yorker, Practical Horseman, Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, Allure, The Nation and her subjects include farming, horse training, child-rearing, literature, impulse buying, getting dressed, Barbie, marriage, among many other topics. She is also the author of the nonfiction books A Year at the Races, Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel, and from Penguin Lives Series, a biography of Charles Dickens. In 2001, she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters and in 2006, she received the PEN USA Lifetime Achievement Award for Literature.

Exhibition Icon Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths
Book Talk with Nancy Marie Brown

Monday, December 3, 6:30 pm
Free

Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths, Book Talk with Nancy Marie BrownJoin award-winning author and former ASF Fellow Nancy Marie Brown for a talk about her newest book, a richly textured narrative that brings to life the intrigue and power struggles in medieval Reykjavík that Icelandic bard Snorri Sturluson inhabited. Drawing on her deep knowledge of Icelandic history and first-hand reading of the original medieval sources, Brown produces a richly textured narrative of a world that continues to fascinate.

Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths, Book Talk with Nancy Marie BrownMuch like Greek and Roman mythology, Norse myths are still with us. Famous storytellers from J.R.R. Tolkien to Neil Gaiman have drawn their inspiration from the long-haired, mead-drinking, marauding, and pillaging Vikings. Their creator is Snorri Sturluson. Like Homer, Snorri was a bard, collecting and embellishing the folklore and pagan legends of medieval Scandinavia. Unlike Homer, Snorri was a man of the world—a wily political power player, one of the richest men in Iceland who came close to ruling it, and even closer to betraying it.

About Nancy Marie Brown:
Nancy Marie Brown is the author of highly-praised books of nonfiction, including The Abacus and the Cross and The Far Traveler. Formerly the editor of the award-winning magazine Research/Penn State, Brown lives in Vermont. Her blog is nancymariebrown.blogspot.com.

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2011

Copenhagen Noir Book Discussion

Tuesday, February 22, 6:30 pm
FREE

Multicultural and Multilingual Identities in Contemporary Sweden-By ASF Visiting Lecturer Dr. Gunlög Sundberg Joining Rome, Paris, Istanbul, London, and Dublin as European hosts for publisher Akashic’s Noir series, Copenhagen Noir features brand-new stories from a top-notch selection of Danish writers, with several Norwegian and Swedish writers also included. This volume definitively reveals why Scandinavian crime fiction has come to be so popular across the world. The panel includes Naja Marie Aidt, Danish lyricist and short story author, and Kristina Stoltz, writer, and is moderated by Hirsh Sawhney, associate editor at Wasafiri Magazine and contributing editor for The Brooklyn Rail.

Copenhagen Noir includes brand-new stories by Naja Marie Aidt, Jonas T. Bengtsson, Helle Helle, Christian Dorph, and Simon Pasternak, Susanne Staun, Lene Kaaberbøl and Agnete Friis, Klaus Rifbjerg, Gretelise Holm, Georg Ursin, Kristian Lundberg, Kristina Stoltz, Seyit Öztürk, Benn Q. Holm, and Gunnar Staalesen.

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Northwave: A Survey of Video Art in the Nordic Countries:
Talk by Lorella Scacco with Performance by Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen

Tuesday, March 1, 6:30 pm
FREE

Northwave: A Survey of Video Art in the Nordic Countries:
Talk by Lorella Scacco with Performance by Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen Northwave: A Survey of Video Art in Nordic Countries (Silvana Editoriale, 2009) offers a broad survey of developments video art from the Nordic countries from the 60s until nowadays and the poetics developed by artists. Particular attention was given to artists who have worked since the 90s. After author Lorella Scacco’s talk, Danish-Filipino artist Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen will stage a performance of her work Mis United.

The book is bilingual (Italian and English) and is divided into two parts: an essay that investigates the early video experiments of the 60s and 80s in the five Nordic countries and then goes to the “Nordic Miracle” that began in the 90s, describing the issues, trends and work of the artists. The second part consists of a series of biographical profiles illustrating the works and ideas of the individual artists that make this book a survey not only of video art but also of recent artistic developments in the Nordic countries in the broader sense.

Among the artists included in the book are Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Lauri Astala, Johanna Billing, Elina Brotherus, Jonas Dahlberg, Maria Friberg, Marit Følstad, Siri Hermansen, Laura Horelli, Henrik Håkansson, Jesper Just, Eva Koch, Ragnar Kjartansson, Annika Larsson, Petra Lindholm, Anu Pennanen, Rúrí, Lars Siltberg, Mika Taanila, Salla Tykkä, Gitte Villesen, Magnus Wallin and Knut Åsdam.

Northwave: A Survey of Video Art in the Nordic Countries: Talk by Lorella Scacco with Performance by Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen Mis United is a musical art tragedy by Rasmussen about a complex contemporary character called Mis United, constantly prepared to change directions and with no solid ground under her feet. Lilibeth will perform 6 new songs that shift from punk to rock and hip-hop, like the ever changing Mis United. Rasmussen has written the lyrics to the songs and composed the music together with the Danish composer Anders Christophersen and recorded the music in a studio in Copenhagen.

Art critic and curator Lorella Scacco has edited monographs and exhibition catalogues of famous Italian and international artists, especially of recent generations. Over the past fifteen years she has curated numerous solo and group exhibitions in Italy and abroad. She collaborated with various public institutions and private foundations, in Italy, including the Venice Biennale, VIU Venice International University, Triennale and Sforzesco Castle in Milan, MACRO Museo d’Arte Contemporanea in Rome, ICE Italian Institute for Foreign Trade, Italian Ministry Heritage and Culture, and abroad, including the Ministries of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Iceland, the Foundation Fritt Ord and Stenersen Museum in Oslo, Tampere Art Museum, and NORDEN Council of Nordic Ministers.

Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen lives in Copenhagen, Denmark. She was born in 1970 in Manila, the Philippines. In 1978 her family moved to her father’s home place Stevns, Denmark. Cuenca primarily engages in video and performance art. Taking her own Danish-Filipino background as a point of departure, Cuenca gathers, adapts, and universalizes her narratives in both a critical and humorous approach in regards to issues such as identity, culture, religion, gender, and social relations. Her productions involve scripted texts/songs; composed music as well as intricate visual elements that include set design and costumes.

Cuenca Rasmussen’s solo exhibitions includes The Heidelberg Kunstverein in 2010, Ego Show at Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen in 2006, Lilith Performance Studio, Malmö in 2007 and Woman in the Rhythm at the Gävle Konstcentrum, Gãvle in 2006. She has participated in numerous exhibitions and performance venues worldwide including: Performa2009 in New York City with the piece “The Present doesn't exist in my Mind and Future is already far behind.” In 2010 the performance was re-staged at Hélio Oititica in Rio de Janiero, at Verbo, Galeria Vermelho in São Paulo, The Living Room Art in Public Spaces in Auckland City, Location One in New York City, Statens Museum for Kunst and Aros in Denmark.

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ASF Centennial Literary Series:
Northern Influences: Americans Look at Great Nordic Writers

Mondays @ 6:30 pm, March 21
Additional panels for Halldór Laxness, Knut Hamsun, and August Strindberg TBA
FREE

This spring begins a series of panel discussions that emphasize the influence of Nordic literature. American authors, dramatists, critics, and their guests discuss giants of Nordic literature from an American perspective. Rooted in dramatic readings, reflections, and lively discussion, these literary evenings allow readers of today a new window into the lives and characters behind the work of a spectrum of Nordic literary geniuses.

ASF Centennial Literary Series:<br />
Northern Influences: Americans Look at Great Nordic Writers - Tove JanssonTove Jansson, the Novelist

March 21

The New York Review of Books Classics series has published three novels for adults by Tove Jansson: The Summer Book, The True Deceiver, and most recently Fair Play. Sophia Jansson in conversation with translator Thomas Teal and Aili Flint, with Tuomas Hiltunen moderating. Readings from the novels by actors Taina Elg and Heli Sirviö. Introduction by Ambassador Ritva Jolkkonen, Consul General of Finland in New York.

Karen Blixen

April 4

In an exciting literary soiree, New Yorker writer Judith Thurman, author of Isak Dinesen: The Life of a Storyteller teams up with her friend the Danish actress and Jade Cat author Suzanne Brøgger to discuss their joint fascination with the life and work of the great Danish writer Karen Blixen, best known for Out of Africa. The evening will include footage of Blixen’s visits to New York in the late 1950s.

Presented in association with The American-Scandinavian Society of New York.

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Curtis L. Carlson Centennial Lecture Series

Monday, April 11 & Monday, May 16, 7 pm
BY INVITATION, please call for details

The Curtis L. Carlson Distinguished Lecture Series was created by the Carlson Family Foundation to support public discourse on important policy issues, furthering ASF’s mission to serve as a leading center for cultural exchange. In honor of the ASF Centennial, the 2011 lecture series features Nobel Peace Prize laureates who represent the highest ideals of service to mankind.

Each will speak for roughly 20 minutes, followed by question and answer sessions with the audience.

Martti Ahtisaari, Former President of the Republic of Finland

April 11
Martti Ahtisaari, Former Finnish President

Poverty and Peace
Kofi Annan, Former United Nations Secretary-General

May 16
Poverty and Peace: 
Kofi Annan, Former U.N. Secretary-General

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The 7th Annual PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature

April 25 through May 1, 2011
Schedule & times vary, please see below
All programs at Scandinavia House are free & open to the public; no reservations are necessary

The Seventh Annual PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature The 2011 PEN World Voices Festival will be held at venues throughout New York City and will focus on the freedom of expression and the international fellowship of writers. This annual showcase of writers from all over the world consists of several days of public panels, literary conversations, readings, and tributes. By convening international writers to discuss their relationships to their public and private selves, PEN World Voices aims to expand the dialogue on essential aspects of the human experience that promises to play a crucial role in the interactions of nations, peoples, and individuals for the foreseeable future.

Scandinavia House joins the festival as a co-sponsor and will host a series of programs. Please visit www.pen.org for schedule and more details.

Writing in a Majority/Minority Cultural Context:
Local Identity vs. a Broader Nation

Wednesday, April 27, 4-5:30

Pulled between calls for regional autonomy versus demands for a stronger federation, regions of the world such as Catalonia, Georgia and Québec tackle questions of cultural identity every day. Join writers from these “minority/majority nations” as they discuss how their multiple identities, regional, national and global, inform the choices they make in their creative work.

Co-sponsored by Scandinavia House, Words Without Borders, and the Blue Metropolis Foundation.

Participants:
Nadine Bismuth
Nicolas Dickner
Dominique Fortier
Mykola Riabchuk
Teresa Solana

Moderated by Susan Harris

Nadine Bismuth’s first book, Les gens fidèles ne font pas les nouvelles (1999), received the Prix des libraires du Québec and the Prix Adrienne-Choquette. She is also the author of the novel Scrapbook (2004) and the collection of short stories Are You Married to a Psychopath (2009), which was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award. She also writes for television and movies. She lives in Montréal.

Nicolas Dickner (b. 1972) is the author of two collections of short stories and the novel Nikolski, which won the 2005 Anne-Hébert prize, among others, and was translated into English in 2010. His latest novel, Apocalypse for Beginners, was published in 2009. He currently lives in Montréal, where he is a columnist and writer for the alternative weekly newspaper Voir.

Dominique Fortier is an editor and translator. Fortier is the author of Les Larmes de saint Laurent and On the Proper Use of Stars. She lives in Montréal.

Mykola Riabchuk is a senior research associate at the Ukrainian Centre for Cultural Studies in Kiev. He is also a member of the editorial board of Krytyka magazine and the Journal of South Eastern Europe. Riabchuk has published poetry, short stories, collections of literary criticism, and essays, including Mrs. Simpson’s Favorite Gun (2009) and Postcolonial Syndrome (2011). His works were translated into eighteen European languages and have been distinguished with many awards, including a Polish-Ukrainian Capitula Award, the Antonovych Prize, and Bene merito.

Teresa Solana (b. 1962) is a translator from Barcelona. She directed the National Translation Centre in Spain for seven years. Now she devotes her time to writing her own novels and translating them into Spanish. A Not So Perfect Crime, her first novel, won the 2007 Brigada 21 Prize for best noir in Catalan, and A Shortcut to Paradise, her second, was short-listed for the 2008 Salambó Prize for best novel in Catalan. Her works have been translated into several languages.

Moderator:
Susan Harris
is the editor of Words Without Borders. With Ilya Kaminsky, she is the co-editor of the most recent Words Without Borders anthology, The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry.

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Translating America

Friday, April 29, 12-1:30 pm

The quest for authenticity and idiosyncrasy would seem to place American writers beyond translation. Yet their popularity abroad – equaled only by loathing for our foreign policy – has sometimes dwarfed their readership at home and reshaped the global literary landscape. Here to discuss how this encounter has influenced their writing and their culture are four authors who have translated canonical American works: Huckleberry Finn, The Bell Jar, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Nickel and Dimed.

Co-sponsored by Scandinavia House

Participants:
Andrej Blatnik
Emmanuelle Ertel
Asaf Schurr
Sandro Veronesi

Moderated by A.M. Homes

Andrej Blatnik (b. 1963) is a Slovenian author of several works of fiction and criticism. He is the president of the jury of the Vilenica International Literary Prize. Blatnik has translated the work of Sylvia Plath and Paul Bowles, among others. His collection of short stories, Skinswaps, was translated into English in 1998.

Emmanuelle Ertel is a professor of French at New York University and a literary translator. Her translations of American novels into French include Louis Begley’s The Man Who Was Late and As Max Saw It, Rick Moody’s The Black Veil, and Tom Perrotta’s Little Children.

Asaf Schurr (b. 1976) is a translator, editor and book critic living in Jerusalem. He has received the Bernstein Prize, the Minister of Culture Prize for Amram, and the Prime Minister’s Prize for Motti. Motti will be published in English by Dalkey Archive Press in the spring of 2011.

Sandro Veronesi (b. 1959) is an Italian novelist, essayist, and journalist. He has published seven novels, one collection of poetry and five non-fiction books. The Force of the Past won the Viareggio-Repaci Prize and the Campiello Prize and was a Zerilli-Marimo finalist. In 2005, he won the Strega Prize for Quiet Chaos. Veronesi now lives in Rome.

Moderator:
A.M. Homes
is the author of This Book Will Save Your Life (2006), Music for Torching (2000), Things You Should Know (2003), and The Safety of Objects (2003) among many others. She has received numerous awards, including Fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, NYFA, the Benjamin Franklin Award, and the Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis. Homes is a contributor to Vanity Fair, BOMB, and other publications. She currently lives in New York City.

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The Great Global Book Swap

Friday, April 29, 2-3:30 pm

Imagine you are invited to a great global book swap and have to bring just one beloved book originally written in a foreign tongue: what would it be? Join five eminent writers who have trotted the globe and lived everywhere from Ireland to India, Latvia to Sudan, for a reading and a talk about the works of translation that enriched and changed their lives.

Co-sponsored by Scandinavia House

Participants:
Leila Aboulela
Mario Bellatín
David Bezmozgis
Fintan O’Toole

Participating moderator:
Colum McCann

Leila Aboulela is the first recipient of the Caine Prize for African Writing. She is the author of The Translator, one of The New York Times’ 100 Notable Books of the Year, and Minaret – both long-listed for the Orange Prize and the IMPAC Dublin Award. Her collection of short stories, Coloured Lights, was short-listed for the Macmillan Silver PEN Award, and her new novel, Lyrics Alley, came out in March 2011. She grew up in Khartoum, lived much of her adult life in Scotland, and now lives in Doha, Qatar.

Mario Bellatín is a Mexican author of the short novels Mujeres de sal, Canon perpetuo, Efecto invernadero, Damas chinas, and Poeta ciego. His 1999 novella Salón de belleza (Beauty Salon) received huge praise and wide recognition. In 2009, City Lights published the first English translation of Beauty Salon to major acclaim, helping to establish broad recognition of his writing in the United States.

Nick Bertozzi is the author of The Salon (2007), a graphic murder mystery that begins at the birth of Cubism in Paris. He also collaborated with Jason Lutes on Houdini: The Handcuff King (2007), the first of Hyperion/CCS’s cartoon-biographies. This year, he published Lewis & Clark (2011) to rave reviews, prompting critic John Hodgman to write: “Bertozzi captures in pictures the Lewis and Clark expedition as no dumb book of prose ever could.” He has taught at Rhode Island School of Design and currently teaches cartooning at School of Visual Arts.

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist and assistant editor at The Irish Times. He has also been a drama critic for the New York Daily News and The Sunday Tribune. An historical and political commentator, O’Toole’s most recent book is Enough is Enough: How to Build a New Republic (Faber and Faber, 2010).

Moderator:
Colum McCann
is the author of the 2009 National Book Award winner for fiction, Let the Great World Spin. He has written four other novels, as well as two critically acclaimed short-story collections. A contributor to The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, GQ, and The Paris Review, he lives in New York City.

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Catalan Literature’s Modern Tradition

Friday, April 29, 4-5:30 pm

One of the world’s most beautiful romance languages, Catalan has a rich literary trove unknown to most of the English-speaking world. A discussion of seminal twentieth-century works, such as Llorenc Villalonga’s The Doll’s Room and Josep Pla’s The Gray Notebook, led by renowned Catalan literary historians and translators, will show you a treasure of literature you’ll wish you’d found sooner.

Co-sponsored by Dalkey Archive Press and New York Review of Book Classics.

Participants:
Enric Bou
Peter Bush
Teresa Solana
Mary Ann Newman

Introduced by
Aleksandar Hemon

Enric Bou, the professor and chair of Hispanic studies at Brown University, specializes in twentieth-century Spanish Peninsular and Catalan literature. His most recent works include Panorama crític de la literatura catalana (2 vols. 2009-2010), Pedro Salinas: Complete Works II: Complete Essays (2007), and Daliccionario: Objetos, mitos y símbolos de Salvador Dalí (2004). In 2000, he was the editor of the Nou diccionari 62 de la literature catalana. The Barcelona-native taught at Wellesley College for seven years and is a recipient of three Ford Foundation Grants and the Josep Vallverdú Prize for Literary Essay.

Peter Bush, a literary translator living in Barcelona, is the former director of the British Centre for Literary Translation. Past translations from Catalan include Quim Monzó’s The Enormity of the Tragedy and Najat El Hachmi’s The Last Patriarch. His translations of Monzó’s Guadalajara, Juan Goytisolo’s Níjar Country, Exiled from Almost Everywhere, and Teresa Solana’s A Shortcut to Paradise were published in 2011.

Teresa Solana (b. 1962) is a translator from Barcelona. She directed the National Translation Centre in Spain for seven years. Now she devotes her time to writing her own novels and translating them into Spanish. A Not So Perfect Crime, her first novel, won the 2007 Brigada 21 Prize for best noir in Catalan, and A Shortcut to Paradise, her second, was short-listed for the 2008 Salambó Prize for best novel in Catalan. Her works have been translated into several languages.

Mary Ann Newman is the director of the Catalan Center at New York University, an affiliate of the Institut Ramon Llull. She is a translator, editor, and occasionally writes about Catalan culture. She has translated the works of authors such as Quim Monzó, Xavier Rubert de Ventós, Joan Maragall, and Narcis Comadira.

Introduced by
Aleksandar Hemon
is the author of The Lazarus Project, a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He has also written three collections of short stories: The Question of Bruno (2001), Nowhere Man (2004), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Love and Obstacles (Riverhead, 2010). He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003 and a “genius grant” from the MacArthur Foundation in 2004.

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New Finnish Design: SCENARIOS - A Story about what Happened in the Future
Lunchtime Talk by Curator Sari Anttonen

Monday, May 9, 12-1 pm
Free admission

New Finnish Design: SCENARIOS - A story about what Happened in the FutureNew Finnish Design SCENARIOS - A Story about what Happened in the Future will be held in the Meatpacking District May 12-17, 2011 during the 24th annual International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York City.

SCENARIOS offers an inspirational look at the designers, design studios, manufacturers, and products that are shaping the landscape of modern Finnish design, while simultaneously exposing the country’s functional and beautiful products to a wider audience.

SCENARIOS includes an exhibition, a student workshop, a cafeteria serving Nordic delicacies by FIKA espresso bar, a pop-up store selling Finnish design items, a lounge area that features lectures and other cultural programming, and export training for participants organized in Helsinki, Finland already in March.

Curated by award-winning interior architect and furniture designer Sari Anttonen, the multilayered SCENARIOS event highlights a wide array of the latest items and concepts by a selected group of Finnish design companies, individual designers and design studios. In addition to the furniture, lighting fixtures, and other interior design objects presented in the show; illustrated stories of the early years of the participating companies allow visitors to familiarize themselves with the ideas, inspirations, and processes traditionally found at the heart of Finnish design. The presentations are extended to also cover the future visions through texts, as well as through ideas and sketches born during the event.

For more information about New Finnish Design SCENARIOS - A Story about what Happened in the Future, please visit their website.

New Finnish Design SCENARIOS—A Story about what Happened in the Future is produced by the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York and the Consulate General of Finland in New York, with the support of Design Forum Finland. Visual identity is by Ahonen & Lamberg. SCENARIOS is an official satellite event of the international World Design Capital Helsinki 2012 project.

The event is organized in collaboration with the Meatpacking District Improvement Association in conjunction with the International Contemporary Furniture Fair and New York Design Week. SCENARIOS is supported by Ministry of Education and Culture in Finland, Ministry of Employment and the Economy, Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland, National Council for Design, Visit Finland, and Graphic Concrete, with additional support for video production from the Alfred Kordelin Foundation.

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exhibition icon Talk by Curator Robert Storr

Wednesday, May 11, 6:30 pm
Free admission

North by New York: New Nordic Art Children’s WorkshopsNorth by New York: New Nordic Art co-curator Robert Storr will speak about the works included in the exhibition, as well as the process involved in gathering it.

Painter, critic, curator, and art historian Robert Storr has been Dean of the Yale School of Art since 2006. Prior to this he was professor of Modern Art at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts (2002-2006) and senior curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York (1990-2002). At MoMA, Mr. Storr organized more than twenty exhibitions-including seminal retrospectives of Gerhard Richter, Robert Ryman (with Tate Gallery, London), Chuck Close, Tony Smith, and Elizabeth Murray-and was coordinator of Projects, the Museum’s exhibition series devoted to the work of contemporary artists. He was also director of the 2007 Venice Biennale.

The author of numerous monographs and catalogues, Mr. Storr is a contributing editor at Art in America and writes frequently for art press, Frieze, Artforum, and other publications.

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lecture icon Talk by Curator Robert Storr

Tuesday, July 19, 6:30 pm
Free admission

Talk by Curator Robert Storr

The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) presents a lecture by internationally renowned scholar and critic Robert Storr on North by New York: New Nordic Art, a focused survey of contemporary Scandinavian art.

Mr. Storr—curator of North by New York with independent scholar and curator Francesca Pietropaolo—will discuss the process of creating the exhibition and the ways in which it illuminates the extraordinary diversity of medium, content, and artistic vision that informs Scandinavian art today.

The exhibition will be open for viewing both before and after the talk. A cocktail reception on the terrace of Scandinavia House will follow, enabling conversation with Mr. Storr and ASF President Edward P. Gallagher.

Painter, critic, curator, and art historian Robert Storr has been Dean of the Yale School of Art since 2006. Prior to this he was professor of Modern Art at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts and senior curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York. At MoMA, Mr. Storr organized more than twenty exhibitions and was coordinator of Projects, the Museum’s exhibition series devoted to the work of contemporary artists. He was also director of the 2007 Venice Biennale. The author of numerous monographs and catalogues, Mr. Storr is a contributing editor at Art in America and writes frequently for art press, Frieze, Artforum, and other publications.

centennial icon Curtis L. Carlson Centennial Lecture Series

Monday, October 3, 5:30 pm
Free admission, but reservations are required. Please RSVP to claire@amscan.org by Wednesday, September 28.

The Curtis L. Carlson Distinguished Lecture series was created by the Carlson Family Foundation to support public discourse on important policy issues. In honor of the ASF Centennial, the lecture series features Nobel Prize laureates who represent the highest ideals of service to mankind. The spring 2011 installments of this series featured Martti Ahtisaari, former President of the Republic of Finland and Kofi Annan, the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations.

Science as an Instrument for Peace
Dr. Torsten Wiesel

October 3

Dr. Torsten WieselIt is difficult to talk about peace without talking about war. But how is it possible to have a serious discussion about science and peace in the confused world in which we live? Daily we learn about killings in different wars and insurrections, attacks and madness of suicide bombers, the collapse of the world economy, global warming, and statistics showing that nearly half of the world population lives on less than $2 a day.

As a child in Sweden in the 1930s, Dr. Wiesel witnessed the events that led to the Second World War and observed the increasing tensions among the leaders and the people of different countries. As a neuroscientist now, he is particularly conscious of the potential contributions to the prevention of war that can be made through better understanding of how the mind works and how it influences behavior – especially as it relates to aggression and violence. By fostering positive alliances across races, cultures, and religions, tensions and barriers that could otherwise lead to war can be reduced. In the world of science, this interaction occurs naturally because the language of science crosses races, cultures, and religions. Touching upon specific examples of scientists whose work has served the cause of peace, Wiesel’s talk will be devoted to the ways in which science can be an instrument of peace.

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membership icon ASF Members Only Lecture:
The 1912 Scandinavian Exhibition: Modern Art before the Armory Show
Lecture by Curator Dr. Patricia Berman

Saturday, October 22, 4 pm
Free admission

This lecture places the 1912 exhibition of modern Scandinavian art in historical context, examining the works that were displayed and the critical reaction to them. In addition, it discusses this exhibition in relation to other important exhibitions of modern art in the United States, from the World’s Columbian Exhibition in Chicago to the 1913 Armory Exhibition in New York.

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Hammershøi & His Contemporaries
Lecture by Dr. Kasper Monrad, Statens Museum for Kunst

Saturday, October 29, 2 pm
$10 ($7 ASF Members)

Hammershøi and His Contemporaries,
Lecture by Dr. Kasper Monrad, Statens Museum for KunstJoin leading art historian and scholar Dr. Kasper Monrad for a stimulating talk on the work of Danish master Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916), one of the most well-known and important Scandinavian painters of the late 19th century. Engage more deeply with a selection of his masterpieces on exclusive loan to the ASF from a private collection. Dr. Monrad will guide audiences through Hammershøi's unique, early modernist paintings - from austere and intimate interior scenes to calm and meditative landscapes - while exploring the dual sense of immobile calm and indefinable tension characteristic of the artist's oeuvre.

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The Young Radical at 50: Edvard Munch in 1913, Lecture by Curator Dr. Patricia BermanThe Young Radical at 50: Edvard Munch in 1913
Lecture by Curator Dr. Patricia Berman

Thursday, November 17, 6:30 pm
$10 ($7 ASF Members)

In the years 1912-1913, Edvard Munch (1863-1944), already a celebrated artist throughout Europe, first exhibited in North America in the Scandinavian Exhibition sponsored by the American-Scandinavian Foundation. In addition, he was designated one of modernism’s great masters in Germany, worked on a monumental mural project in Kristiania, and developed new techniques that reanimated his art. This lecture examines this critical period in the artist’s career.

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August Strindberg and His Turbulent Life
Lecture by Lena Einhorn

Tuesday, November 27, 6:30 pm
Free

August Strindberg and His Turbulent Life, Lecture by Lena EinhornSwedish author and playwright August Strindberg – a brilliant and yet highly controversial personage – died a hundred years ago this year. He is considered by many to be the best author who ever wrote in the Swedish language. But Strindberg is known not only for his extensive body of work, but also for his complicated personality, which combined a deep-rooted misogyny with an attraction to strong women (to name only one of his many contradictions). Consequently Strindberg has become known, and hotly debated, not only for what he wrote, but also for how he lived.

Author and filmmaker Lena Einhorn examines Strindberg’s turbulent life, focusing on his tumultuous first marriage to Siri von Essen, the Swedish-speaking Finnish noblewoman and actress.

About Lena Einhorn:
Lena Einhorn is a Swedish author, filmmaker, and director from Sweden. Her book Nina’s Journey/Ninas resa received the prestigious August Prize – the Swedish National Book Award – in 2005; her film of the same name was awarded two Guldbagge awards for Best Film and Best Manuscript, as well as a number of international prizes.

Einhorn has written six books and made more than twenty films. In the last few years, she has completed three projects on Strindberg. In 2007 she made a television documentary called Strindberg, A Damn Life; in 2010 she served as editor of the richly illustrated anthology On Strindberg, and last year published the novel Siri, the story of August Strindberg’s first, and very dramatic marriage.

Co-presented by the Consulate General of Sweden in New York.

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2010

Jean Sibelius: A Composer’s Life and the Awakening of Finland
Lecture by Dr. Glenda Goss

Tuesday, February 23, 6:30 pm
$10 ($8 ASF Members; FREE to students with a valid ID)

Jean Sibelius: A Composer’s Life and the Awakening of Finland 
Lecture by Dr. Glenda GossComposer Jean Sibelius (1865–1957) came to prominence during Finland’s golden age of the arts. The timing was no coincidence, for Sibelius helped to shape that golden era while in turn being shaped by it. In her talk, Dr. Glenda Dawn Goss, teaches at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki and a former Professor of Musicology at the University of Georgia, will present this national creative tide in the context of Nordic cultural currents and will discuss the vital importance of the wider Nordic world for the creation of that display. The events of Finland’s golden age were fueled by wider geo-political forces in the course of which Finland came under Russian control after centuries of being a part of Sweden. The push and pull of east and west spurred Sibelius and his contemporaries to create a dazzling outpouring of music, art, drama, and literature that endowed Finns with a sense of pride, awakened them to their unique heritage, and defined what it meant to be Finnish.

Should Gender Equality be Mandated?
Added Seminar & Panel Discussion

Monday, March 1, 12-2:30 pm
FREE, but reservations are required
Please RSVP to migs@mfa.no

Is government involvement needed to secure gender equality or are corporations already leading the way? Have the principles of gender equality been established or does the debate need to continue? Audun Lysbakken, Norwegian Minister of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion, addresses these topics in a key note address and seminar, with a panel discussion moderated by Michael Kimmel, Stony Brook University.

Hosted by The Norwegian Consulate General in New York, The New York Women’s Forum, Catalyst, and Innovation Norway.

Chronic Heart Failure: A Comparison Between Sweden & the United States
Lecture by Jan Mårtensson

Tuesday, March 2, 6:30 pm
FREE, no tickets or reservations required; seating is first-come first-served

Chronic Heart Failure: A Comparison Between Sweden and the United StatesJan Mårtensson, visiting ASF scholar and Associate Professor of Nursing from the School of Health Sciences and Supervisor at the Primary Care Research and Development Unit in Jönköping, Sweden, compares follow-up care for heart disease patients in Sweden and the United States. Mårtensson also highlights the most important reforms that must be accomplished in heart disease and health care in the near future. Despite a continuing favorable trend in the occurrence of most cardiovascular diseases, heart failure is a significant and growing public health problem. More than 95% of admissions and days of hospitalization involve persons over 65 years of age. In Sweden this group of patients accounts for approximately 20% of all medical care events and 30% of all days of care due to heart disease. In the U.S. patients with heart failure account for about one-tenth of the Medicare population but over one-third of all Medicare spending, presenting an unsustainable burden as the population ages and the demand for in-hospital care increases.

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The American Girl
Reading & book talk with Monika Fagerholm

Tuesday, March 9, 6:30 pm
FREE, no tickets or reservations required; seating is first-come first-served

The American Girl-
Reading and book talk with Monika FagerholmIn 1969, a young American girl named Eddie de Wire travels from Coney Island to the swampy coast of Finland and drowns in a marsh while wearing a red plastic raincoat, her premature death becoming part of local folklore. As her mythology builds, two imaginative and ferociously devoted young friends—Sandra and Doris, each with their own troubled history—search for hidden meaning and answers to Eddie’s demise. The girls construct their own world, their own language, and their own rules. But playing adult games has adult consequences, and what begins as two girls striking matches leads to an inferno that threatens to consume them and tear their worlds apart.

Gyrating from the swinging 60s to the mod early 70s, this complex narrative is kept on track by Fagerholm’s gifts as a storyteller. Part mysterious gothic saga, part chronicle of an era, and part a portrait of youth on the cusp of sexual awakening, The American Girl is a bewitching glimpse into the human psyche.

The American Girl-
Reading and book talk with Monika FagerholmAlready an international phenomenon, The American Girl from Scandinavian novelist Monika Fagerholm is simply unforgettable. A number one bestseller in Sweden and Finland, it has sold more than 200,000 copies to date, and has been sold in 13 countries. It is the recipient of the premier literary award in Sweden—The August Prize, as well as The Aniara Prize and The Gothenburg Post Award, and has been short-listed for The International IMPAC Literary Award.

Monika Fagerholm, one of Scandinavia’s most renowned authors, was born in Helsinki, Finland in 1961 and belongs to the Swedish-speaking community in Finland. Her much praised first novel, Wonderful Women by the Sea (New Press, 1997), won numerous awards, was short-listed for both the August Prize and the Finlandia Prize, and was made into a motion picture. With the publication of Diva in 1998, Fagerholm stirred up a cult-like following across Scandinavia and was awarded The Swedish Literature Society Award and Nyland’s Art Award.

The Viking in the Wheatfield: A Scientist’s Struggle to Preserve the World’s Harvest
Lecture & reading with Susan Dworkin

Tuesday, March 16, 6:30 pm
FREE, no tickets or reservations required; seating is first-come first-served

The Viking in the Wheatfield: A Scientist’s Struggle to Preserve the World’s HarvestNew York City author and journalist Susan Dworkin’s newest book takes the reader into the world of Bent Skovmand (1945-2007), a brilliant Danish plant scientist who fought to preserve and expand the world’s wheat supply. For 35 years Skovmand collected, multiplied, and documented the world’s wheat varieties, helping to protect the harvest against mutant plagues and revolutionary climate change. Before his untimely death in 2007, he worked to develop the so-called “Doomsday Vault” on Norway’s Arctic border where nations store their crop seeds under tons of ice and rock as insurance against catastrophe.

The Viking in the Wheatfield: A Scientist’s Struggle to Preserve the World’s HarvestIn an era when multinational corporations and governments often jealously guard breeding patents and information, Skovmand fought to keep his seed bank a center for free, open scientific exchange, as a service to breeders and farmers everywhere. When nations locked up their seeds, he fought to keep germplasm an internationally available public good. The Viking in the Wheatfield goes to the heart of the struggle to save the harvest, one seed at a time. Skovmand’s life casts a bright and welcome light on an agricultural sector – the international seed banks – upon which we are all crucially dependent and about which most of us know far too little. As Bent Skovmand often told visitors to his collection, “If the seeds disappear, so could your food. So could you.”

Dworkin has written several biographies, including The Nazi Officer’s Wife, and her articles have appeared in Ms., Ladies’ Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, and numerous other magazines. Her fascination with agriculture dates from early stints at the United States Department of Agriculture and as a journalist covering aid programs in the Middle East. She lives in New York City and the Berkshires.

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Fashion & Films

Thursday, March 11 & Thursday, March 18, both @ 6:30 pm
$9 ($6 ASF Members)

The moving image has represented and (re)interpreted fashion as a concept, an industry and as a cultural form since its inception. Subtly but strongly, fashion exists in the interstices of film aesthetics, possessing the ability to not only enhance a character’s persona and the drama of life, but also the capability to encourage critical response with regard to a film’s content, position in society, and relation to the human experience.

Scandinavia House presents a miniseries of screenings and lectures that closely examine fashion’s role in two Swedish films – Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night/Sommarnattens leende (1955) and Arne Mattsson’s Mannequin in Red/Mannekäng i rött (1958).

Smiles of a Summer Night/Sommarnattens leende
Film screening with lecture by Astrid Söderbergh Widding

Thursday, March 11, 6:30 pm

Smiles of a Summer Night/Sommarnattens leende; 
Film screening with lecture by Astrid Söderbergh WiddingDirected by Ingmar Bergman (1955). The 1956 prize-winning comedy Smiles of a Summer Night ushered in an international audience for director Ingmar Bergman. Set in turn-of-the-century Sweden, four women and four men attempt to juggle the laws of attraction amidst their daily bourgeois life. When a weekend in the country brings them all face to face, the women ally to force the men’s hands in their matters of the heart, exposing their pretensions and insecurities along the way. Chock full of flirtatious propositions and sharp-witted wisdom, Smiles of a Summer Night is one of film history’s great tragicomedies, a bittersweet view of the transience of human carnality. 108 min.

Smiles of a Summer Night/Sommarnattens leende; 
Film screening with lecture by Astrid Söderbergh WiddingSwedish costume designer and culture personality MAGO (Max Goldstein) designed the film’s costumes, firmly establishing an example of centralized cooperation between the two artists that lasted throughout the years and spanned many films. Whereas Bergman preferred his old leather jacket and beret, MAGO was a true elegant. However, they could unite their artistic vision for absolute quality. Their two artistic temperaments are as fascinating as they may seem out of date in an age rather dominated by effects and quantity.

Professor Astrid Söderbergh Widding is in the Cinema Studies Department and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at Stockholm University, Chair of the Ingmar Bergman Foundation, and on the board of The Swedish Film Institute and The Swedish Fulbright Commission.

Mannequin in Red/Mannekäng i rött
Film screening with lecture by Louise Wallenberg

Thursday, March 18, 6:30 pm

Mannequin in Red/Mannekäng i rött: 
Film screening with lecture by Louise WallenbergDirected by Arne Mattsson (1958). A private detective doubling up as a fashion mannequin, a head designer with lesbian inclinations and a mean, wheelchair-based fashion house matron ominously accompanied by a white cat…welcome to the strange world of the couture salon “La Femme,” where the elegant surface soon starts to peel, revealing what’s hidden and repressed underneath. 108 min.

The combination of uncanny murders, romantic love and traditional comedy make this film one of a kind, thanks in part to director Arne Mattsson, dubbed the “Swedish Hitchcock” due to his daring framing and calculated use of color. What adds to its uniqueness are the costumes made by designer MAGO, who in the making of this film must have had the time of his life, designing effeminate fashion without – it seems – any limitation to his creativity and fantasy.

Dr. Louise Wallenberg will focus on the specific Mattssonian crime genre and its relation to the Italian giallo and to the crime genre as developed in Swedish cinema and literature. She will also focus on the meaning of the many costumes and on the implicit narrative that deals with women’s desire.

Wallenberg is the acting director of the Centre for Fashion Studies and holds a PhD in Cinema Studies (2002) from Stockholm University.

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Conditions of Architecture & Current Works
Lecture by Craig Dykers

Tuesday, March 30, 7 pm
$10 ($8 ASF Members, FREE to Students with a valid ID)

A companion lecture to the exhibition SNØHETTA architecture – landscape – interior, Snøhetta co-founder Craig Dykers will present recent works from the Snøhetta office and discuss contemporary conditions in architectural practice that the firm is evaluating.

Dykers co-founded the architecture and design firm in 1989 – the same year the firm won the international competition to design the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt. Snøhetta established a New York office in 2004, the year it was awarded the commission for the National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion at the World Trade Center.

The international practice emphasizes site-specific and environmentally responsible design solutions that “enhance…qualities of place and create diverse and rich architectural experiences.” Featured in a multi-faceted exhibition at Scandinavia House on view through April 3, 2010, SNØHETTA architecture – landscape – interior offers insight into the design and construction of the firm’s most important works and includes films, photographs, drawings, models, and interactive learning devices.

A Blaze in the Northern Sky:
Norwegian Black Metal & the Culture that Spawned it

Thursday, April 29, 7 pm
$10 ($8 ASF Members)

In the last two decades, a bizarre, intense, and violent musical subculture called Black Metal has emerged in Norway, and has subsequently become a worldwide phenomenon. In a unique seminar-meets-radio show format moderated by Patrizia Mazzuoccolo, the lecture will explore and promote the genre and its country through audio clips of bands, interviews with musicians and guests, and an audience Q & A session.

Black Metal is a distinctive mix of Satanism, Nordic mythology, and extreme heavy metal. It is the basis of a Norwegian subculture that aggressively forsakes Christianity and mainstream society in favor of Norse mythology, epic Scandinavian nature, and self-inflicted isolation. This violent subculture attracted international attention in the early 1990s with a string of murders, suicides, grave desecrations, and the arson of over 20 Christian churches.

A Blaze in the Northern Sky:
Norwegian Black Metal & the Culture that Spawned itParticipants include (via Skype or media feed):

Harald Fossberg, first singer in TURBONEGRO and a veteran of the punk and metal scene in Norway. Currently works as the main rock / metal entertainment journalist for Norwegian broadsheet, Aftenposten;

Nocturno Culto, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter half of legendary Oslo-based band, DARKTHRONE;

Gaahl, ex-GORGOROTH vocalist now performing with folk-inspired crew WARDRUNA and recently recruited by the Bergen Theatre Den Nationale Scene for the role of Heimdal in the play Svartediket which has caused more controversy in Norway.

Moderator:

Patrizia Mazzuoccolo has worked as a music journalist for over 10 years contributing to magazines like Metal Hammer (UK), Terrorizer (UK), Rock Sound (UK), and Metal Maniacs (US), and still writes for Rhythm, where in 2002-2003 she had her own metal column. She worked as a Promotions Producer for the Sky Television network in London from 1998 - 2002, did screen work on MTV2's The Riot (2002), and freelanced for The Rock Show on BBC Radio One in connection with the Norwegian black metal special (2006).

Mazzuoccolo lived in London for 14 years, in Oslo for 6 and currently resides in New York where she is writing a book on the subject of Norwegian metal and culture.

During her time in Oslo, Mazzuoccolo worked as a Marketing and Promotion officer for Moonfog Productions, label manager for Tabu Recordings, acted as consultant and co-organizer of the sold-out Scandinavian metal night at SXSW (2008) and was the co-creator, roving reporter and producer of popular metal show Tinitus on Norwegian national radio NRK P3 from 2005 until early 2009 (www.nrk.no/tinitus).

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The Sixth Annual PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature

Friday, April 30 & Saturday, May 1
FREE, no tickets or reservations required; seating is first-come first-served

The Sixth Annual PEN World Voices Festival of International LiteratureThe 2010 PEN World Voices Festival will be held from April 26 to May 2 at venues throughout New York City and will focus on the freedom of expression and the international fellowship of writers. This annual showcase of writers from all over the world consists of several days of public panels, literary conversations, readings, and tributes. By convening international writers to discuss their relationships to their public and private selves, PEN World Voices aims to expand the dialogue on essential aspects of the human experience that promises to play a crucial role in the interactions of nations, peoples, and individuals for the foreseeable future.

The Poetry of Edward Hopper

Friday, April 30, 1 – 2 pm

The great American painter of solitude returns brilliantly illuminated and transformed by the Catalan poet Ernest Farrés, whose recent publication Edward Hopper is a collection of poems based on the artist’s paintings. New York poet Edward Hirsh, who has also written about Hopper, joins Farrés for a conversation about the power of Hopper’s imagery to invoke poetry.

Participants: Ernest Farrés and Edward Hirsh

Ernest Farrés (Catalonia/Spain) is a journalist and writer. He works for the cultural supplement of La Vanguardia newspaper. He is the author of three volumes of poetry in Catalan: Clavar-ne una al mall i l’altra a l’enclusa (Hit or Miss), Mosquits (Mosquitoes), and Edward Hopper.

Edward Hirsch (United States) a MacArthur Fellow, was born in Chicago in 1950. He has published seven books of poems including, For the Sleepwalkers, Wild Gratitude, Special Orders, and, most recently, The Living Fire: New and Selected Poems. He has also written four prose books, including Poet’s Choice.

Cosponsored by The American-Scandinavian Foundation and Institut Ramon Llull

Short Stories: Past, Present, and Future

Friday, April 30, 3:30 – 5 pm

What virtues and challenges are unique to the short story? How flexible is the form? And why is it that, even now—after Poe, Chekov, Hemingway, O’Connor, Nabokov, and Munro—the short story often gets less respect, in terms of prizes and critical esteem, than the novel? Join acclaimed practitioners of the form from Bosnia, Israel, China, Mexico, and the United States, for a conversation with The New Yorker fiction editor, Deborah Treisman about the past, present, and future of the short story.

Participants: Preston L. Allen, Alex Epstein, Aleksandar Hemon, Yiyun Li, and Martin Solares

Moderated by Deborah Treisman

Preston L. Allen (United States) is the author of the critically acclaimed novels All or Nothing and Jesus Boy and the award-winning collection Churchboys and Other Sinners. His stories have appeared in numerous magazines and journals and have been anthologized in Brown Sugar, Miami Noir, and Las Vegas Noir. Allen is the recipient of a State of Florida Individual Artist Fellowship.

Alex Epstein (Russia/Israel) is the author of three collections of short stories and three novels. He was awarded Israel’s Prime Minister’s Prize for Literature. His short-short stories have appeared in English in Words Without Borders, The Iowa Review, and other journals. His forthcoming novel is titled Blue Has No South.

Aleksandar Hemon (Bosnia/U.S.) is the author of The Lazarus Project, a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award, and three collections of short stories: The Question of Bruno, Nowhere Man (a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award), and Love and Obstacles. He edited the Best European Fiction 2010. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and a “genius grant” from the MacArthur Foundation in 2004.

Yiyun Li (China/U.S.) is the winner of the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Hemingway Foundation/ PEN Award, and the Guardian First Book Award. The author of The Vagrants and A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, Li was selected for a Whiting Award, and by Granta as one of the best young American novelists. Her next collection of stories, Gold Boy, Emerald Girl, will be published in September.

Martin Solares (Mexico) is a fiction writer and critic. He received the Efraín Huerta National Literary Award in 1998 for his short story “El Planeta Cloralex.” Los Minuts Negros (The Black Minutes) was shortlisted for the Rómulo Gallegos International Novel Prize and has been published in Spanish, English, and German.

Deborah Treisman (United States) has been fiction editor of The New Yorker since 2003. Previously, she was the managing editor of Grand Street, and has been a member of the editorial staffs of The New York Review of Books, Harper’s, and The Threepenny Review. Her translations have appeared in The New Yorker, The Nation, Harper’s, and Grand Street.

Cosponsored by The American-Scandinavian Foundation

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Peter Schneider and Paul Auster in Conversation

Friday, April 30, 5:30 – 6:30 pm

Award-winning German author Peter Schneider, who has published over 20 novels, screenplays, and volumes of journalistic essays since his first novel, Lenz, in 1973, will be interviewed by Brooklyn-based Paul Auster, whose works including The Brooklyn Follies, The Book of Illusions, and The New York Trilogy are studies of American urban existential dread. Come listen as the two authors compare notes on their literary maps and oeuvres, homelands real and imagined, and their common journeys as authors over the past few tumultuous decades.

Participants: Paul Auster and Peter Schneider

Paul Auster (United States) is the best-selling author of Invisible, Man in the Dark, The Brooklyn Follies, The Book of Illusions, and The New York Trilogy, among many other works. He has been short-listed for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, and the Edgar Award. Auster’s work has been translated into thirty-five languages.

Peter Schneider (Germany) published his first novel Lenz in 1973. More than twenty other novels, screenplays, and volumes of essays followed, including Der Mauerspringer (The Wall Jumper), Extreme Mittelage (The German Comedy), and Paarungen (Couplings). Since 2001, he has been the Roth Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Georgetown University.

Cosponsored by The American-Scandinavian Foundation

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War and the Novel

Saturday, May 1, 12:30 – 2 pm

Filip Florian’s novel Little Fingers imagines the discovery of a mass grave in a small town. Atiq Rahimi’s The Patience Stone depicts a woman who must nurse her husband while besieged by violence in Afghanistan. In CrocAttack, Assaf Gavron invents a reluctant media celebrity, famous because he did not die in a terrorist attack. And Bernardo Atxaga, in The Accordionist’s Son, has revisited the Spanish Civil War and examined its long repercussions. Why have novelists so long been drawn to the subject of war? And how do writers engage with this fraught and complicated subject? Join novelists from Afghanistan, Spain, Romania, and Israel as they discuss these and many other questions.

Participants: Bernardo Atxaga, Filip Florian, Assaf Gavron, and Atiq Rahimi

Bernardo Atxaga (Spain) is a writer of novels, short stories, poetry, plays, essays, children’s books, and screenplays for radio and film. He began publishing in his native language of Euskara in the 1970s. Atxaga’s Obabakoak was awarded the Spanish National Literature Prize in 1989 and has been translated into twenty-five languages. His most recent novel, The Accordionist’s Son, was published in 2008.

Filip Florian (Romania) worked as a journalist and reporter for Radio Free Europe. Little Fingers, his first novel, has received numerous awards, including Best Debut Novel from the Romanian Writers Union.

Assaf Gavron (Israel) is an author, translator, and musician. He has published five books of fiction and his short stories have appeared in various anthologies and publications. Among the many works he has translated from English into Hebrew are the novels of Jonathan Safran Foer, Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth, and 9 Stories by J.D. Salinger.

Atiq Rahimi (Afghanistan/France) is recognized as both a writer and a renowned maker of documentary and feature films. The film of his novel Earth and Ashes was in the Official Selection at Cannes Festival in 2004. He is currently adapting one of his novels, A Thousand Rooms of Dreams and Fear, for the screen. Since 2001, Rahimi has returned to Afghanistan to set up a Writers’ House in Kabul to offer support and training for young Afghan writers and filmmakers. His latest novel is The Patience Stone.

Cosponsored by The American-Scandinavian Foundation

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The Essay

Saturday, May 1, 5:30 – 6:30 pm

Almost all modern essays are written in prose, but works in verse such as Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Criticism and An Essay on Man contribute to the form’s rich history. Brevity is often a defining principle, but the opposite holds true as well, with examples such as John Locke’s voluminous An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. These writers, all of them accomplished essayists, discuss the form — its great history, its restraints, freedoms, and challenges.

Participants: Quim Monzó, Peter Schneider, and Jean-Philippe Toussaint

Moderated by Susan Harris, editorial director, Words Without Borders

Quim Monzó (Catalonia/Spain) is the recipient of the National Award for fiction, the City of Barcelona Award, the Prudenci Bertrana Award, the El Temps Award for best novel, the Lletra d’Or Prize, and the Catalan Writers’ Award. He has also won Serra d’Or magazine’s Critics’ Award four times and is a contributor to the La Vanguardia newspaper. Most of his novels are written in Catalan, including the most recent, Mil Cretins.

Peter Schneider (Germany) published his first novel Lenz in 1973. More than twenty other novels, screenplays, and volumes of essays followed, including Der Mauerspringer (The Wall Jumper), Extreme Mittelage (The German Comedy), and Paarungen (Couplings). Since 2001, he has been the Roth Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Georgetown University.

Jean-Philippe Toussaint (France/Belgium) has written seven novels and several films. His work has been compared to the work of Samuel Beckett, and the films of Jacques Tati and Jim Jarmusch. Running Away was awarded the Prix Médicis in 2005. He is included in Best European Fiction 2010. His forthcoming books are Self-Portrait Abroad and The Truth About Marie.

Susan Harris (United States) is the editorial director of Words Without Borders. With Ilya Kaminsky, she is the coeditor of the most recent Words Without Borders anthology, The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry.

Cosponsored by The American-Scandinavian Foundation and Words Without Borders

Participating Nordic Authors
Please visit www.pen.org for schedule and more details.

Naja Marie Aidt (Denmark) has published nine collections of poetry and three collections of short stories. She is included in Best European Fiction 2010. Aidt has also written several plays, children’s books, song lyrics, and the screenplay for the feature film Strings. In 2008, her collection Bavian received the most prestigious literary prize awarded in the Nordic countries, the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize.

Jostein Gaarder (Norway) is the author of Sophie’s World, which has been translated into 53 languages and has sold over 30 million copies. His other works include children’s books and adult novels such as The Solitaire Mystery, Through a Glass, Darkly, Vita Brevis, among many others. Gaarder has been involved in the promotion of human rights and sustainable development for several years, establishing the Sophie Prize, an annual international environment and development prize.

Frederic Hauge (Norway) established the Bellona Foundation in 1986. Through investigation, documentation, legal action, and nonviolent activism, Bellona has brought changes in environmental policies in Norway and internationally. Today, Bellona is an international scientific and technology-based environmental NGO. In 2007 Hauge was elected vice chairman of the European Commission’s Technology Platform for Zero Emission Fossil Fuel Power Plants, and TIME Magazine named him a Hero of the Environment.

Karl O. Knausgaard (Norway) made his debut with the novel Ute Av Verden (Out of the World). A Time for Everything, his second novel and his first to be published in English, was nominated for the Nordic Council Prize. The first volume of his celebrated six-volume Min Kamp (My Struggle) received Norway’s prestigious Brage Prize in 2009.

Bjørn Lomborg (Denmark) is the organizer and director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, which brings together some of the world’s top economists to set priorities for the world. In 2008 he was named “one of the 50 people who could save the planet” by the UK Guardian, “one of the top 100 public intellectuals” by Foreign Policy and Prospect magazines, and “one of the world’s 75 most influential people of the 21st century” by Esquire.

Sofi Oksanen (Finland) is the author of the novels Stalin’s Cows, Baby Jane, and most recently, Purge. Purge — the first book to win both of Finland’s top literary awards, the Finlandia and the Runeberg — is based on her acclaimed and controversial play of the same name, originally staged at the National Theater in Helsinki. In 2009, Oksanen was named Estonia’s Person of the Year.

Janne Teller (Denmark) is the author of Odin’s Island, which has been translated into five languages. Her second novel, Nothing, written for young adults, was awarded the Danish Cultural Ministry Prize for best children’s book of 2001, as well as the prestigious Le Prix Libbylit 2008 for best novel for children in the French-speaking world.

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Music Export NorwayEco Chic-related Programs @ Scandinavia House

Symposium - Towards Sustainable Fashion
Directly followed by the Opening Party for Eco Chic in Volvo Hall

Tuesday, May 4, 6:30 pm, Victor Borge Hall

A symposium, in conjunction with the opening of the exhibit Eco Chic - Towards Sustainable Fashion, with fashion designers who take an environmentally-friendly and ethical approach to their work, without sacrificing style. The panel of speakers includes designers and fashion experts from Sweden and the United States - Marcus Bergman, Karin Stenmar, Sass Brown and Eviana Hartman, and is moderated by Dr. Hazel Clark, Dean of the School of Art and Design and Theory, Parsons: The New School for Design.

The symposium is followed by a party celebrating the opening of the exhibit Eco Chic - Towards Sustainable Fashion at Scandinavia House, with music by Markus Görsch (of Love is all) and Gary Olson (of Ladybug Transistor & Marlborough Farms) . The exhibit will remain open until 9:30 pm.

Marcus Bergman is one of the partners of Bergman's (a part of the exhibition). Bergman is a researcher at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg and lecturer at University College of Borås. For more information, please visit www.ecocotton.com/.

Karin Stenmar is one of the two founders of Dem Collective (a part of the exhibition). Since 2004 Karin and Annika Axelsson have ensured that Sweden receives a steady supply of fair produced and organic clothes from Dem Collective's own factories in Sri Lanka. For more information, please visit www.demcollective.com/.

Sass Brown is a full time professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, now resident in Florence, Italy, where she is the Resident Director for FIT's study abroad program. Originally from London, England, Sass established herself as a designer with her own signature collection selling across Canada, and as VP of Merchandising for Perry Ellis Kids. As an academic, Sass's area of research is in the area of community outreach and ethical design practices in fashion based businesses. Sass has published papers and spoken around the world on the topic of sustainable design. She has also worked and volunteered in women's cooperatives in Latin America, and in particular in Brazil's largest favela - Rocinha, as well as taught workshops to manufacturers and fashion enterprises in Peru.

Eviana Hartman, founder and designer Bodkin. Hartman was the fashion features editor at NYLON, fashion writer at Vogue and Teen Vogue, and the founding columnist of EcoWise in The Washington Post. She collaborated with designer Wendy Mullin on the Sew U series of books for Little, Brown and Potter Craft, and has written about music, style, architecture, and design for such publications as Dwell, I.D., Purple Fashion, VMan, Domino, and Wired. Her interest in sustainability began while studying under architect William McDonough, author of Cradle to Cradle. She is also a modern dancer and plays drums in the band Open Ocean.

Dr. Hazel Clark is Dean of the School of Art and Design History at Parsons the New School for Design. She is a design historian and theorist who has taught internationally and has a particular interest in design and culture, and fashion and textiles including ethical practices. Her most recent publications include co-editing Old Clothes, New Looks: Second Hand Fashion (Berg, 2005), The Fabric of Cultures: Fashion, Identity and Globalization (Routledge, 2009) and Design Studies: A Reader (Berg, 2009). Her articles include: SLOW + FASHION - An Oxymoron or a Promise for the Future..?, Fashion Theory, 12: 4, December 2008.

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Talk and Walk
Eco-Fashion Going Green & Eco Chic – Towards Sustainable Swedish Fashion

Wednesday, June 9, 10:30 am
FREE, but registration is required
For information and to register, please visit www.fitnyc.edu/museum

Join us for a walk through New York City visiting two exhibitions that highlight sustainability in fashion. First have a tour with curator Jennifer Farley of The Museum at FIT’s Eco-Fashion: Going Green and then visit Eco Chic – Towards Sustainable Swedish Fashion at Scandinavia House.

Meeting point: The Museum at FIT, 10:30 am, 7th Avenue (@ 27th Street), continuing to Scandinavia House

This event is organized in collaboration with The Museum at FIT. For information, visit www.fitnyc.edu.

The Annual Nordic Forum 2010:
Investment Trends in a Challenging Economy

Tuesday, September 14, 6 pm
$50; reservations are required. Please RSVP to event_reservation@amscan.org

The five Nordic-American Chambers of Commerce and The American-Scandinavian Foundation present Nordic Forum 2010, a panel discussion and reception with the theme Investment Trends in a Challenging Economy.

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The Ambassador
Book Talk with Bragi Ólafsson

Thursday, September 30, 6:30 pm
FREE

The Ambassador-Book Talk with Bragi ÓlafssoSturla Jón Jónsson, the fifty-something building superintendent and sometimes poet, has been invited to a poetry festival in Vilnius, Lithuania, appointed, as he sees it, as the official representative of the people of Iceland to the field of poetry. His latest poetry collection, published on the eve of his trip to Vilnius, is about to cause some controversy in his home country—Sturla is publicly accused of having stolen the poems from his long-dead cousin, Jónas.

The Ambassador-Book Talk with Bragi ÓlafssoThen there’s Sturla’s new overcoat, the first expensive item of clothing he has ever purchased, which causes him no end of trouble. And the article he wrote for a literary journal, which points out the stupidity of literary festivals and declares the end of his career as a poet. Sturla has a lot to deal with, and that’s not counting his estranged wife and their five children, nor the increasingly bizarre experiences and characters he’s forced to confront at the festival in Vilnius.

Bragi Ólafsson’s most recent work The Ambassador is a quirky novel that’s filled with insightful and wry observations about aging, family, love, and the mysteries of the hazelnut. It was a finalist for the 2008 Nordic Literature Prize and received the Icelandic Bookseller’s Award as Best Novel of the Year.

Ólafsson was born in Reykjavík, and may be most well known for playing bass in The Sugarcubes, Björk’s first band. After recording three albums and touring the world, he quit making music and turned to writing. He is the author of several books of poetry and short stories, and four novels, including Party Games, for which he received the DV Cultural Prize in 2004. He is also a founder of the publishing company Smekkleysa (Bad Taste), and has translated Paul Auster's City of Glass into Icelandic.

Co-presented in collaboration with Open Letter Books.

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Nordic Design Now

Wednesday, November 10 & Thursday, November 11, both @ 7 pm
Individual tickets for each program: $15 ($10 ASF & CH Members)

Nordic Design Now consists of two panel discussions, Social Awareness & Sustainability and Design Policy: Lessons Learned, co-presented by Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and The American-Scandinavian Foundation. These panels are held in conjunction with two design exhibitions: National Triennial 2010: Why Design Now? at Cooper-Hewitt and Nordic Models + Common Ground at Scandinavia House.

Nordic Culture FundCo-presented by Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and The American-Scandinavian Foundation. Funding for this program has been provided by the Nordic Culture Fund, with special thanks to the Consulate General of Denmark in New York; the Consulate General of Iceland; the Consulate General of Finland in New York; the Royal Norwegian Consulate General; and the Consulate General of Sweden, New York.

Social Awareness & Sustainability

Moderated by Matilda McQuaid, Deputy Curatorial Director, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
7 pm Wednesday, November 10, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

Designers working in the Nordic countries often favor simplicity, clean lines, and modern shapes and colors. Nordic designers also have a long tradition of creating designs for products, public spaces and buildings that take into account quality of life and social responsibility. Sustainability has also been an integral part of Nordic design traditions through consideration of materials and craftsmanship. Many emerging, as well as established designers in the Nordic region are currently working on projects that are not only aesthetically pleasing, but also focus on social welfare and the environmental impact of the designs.

The first panel is moderated by Matilda McQuaid, Deputy Curatorial Director, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, and features leading Nordic designers discussing their stance on sustainability and social responsibility in their work and current design practices.

Panelists:
Nille Juul-Sørensen, Associate Director with Arup
Ville Kokkonen, Design Director of Artek Oy
Halla Helgadóttir, Managing Director of the Iceland Design Centre
Lavrans Løvlie, co-founder of London-based design service agency liveıwork
Stefan Magnusson, Founding Partner & Senior Industrial Designer, No Picnic AB

Design Policy: Lessons Learned

Moderated by Bradford McKee, Editor-in-Chief of Landscape Architecture Magazine
Panel introductions by Mr. Trond Giske, Norwegian Minister of Trade and Commerce
7 pm Thursday, November 11, Scandinavia House

How does policy cultivate the right conditions for design markets to be competitive on a global scale and still be socially minded? The Nordic countries have set a precedent for design policy in the global design community. Today Nordic design and business increasingly go hand-in-hand. Promoting good design that creates solutions to social, ethical, and environmental problems has proven over time to be good business for the Nordic design market.

Moderated by Bradford McKee, Editor-in-Chief, Landscape Architecture Magazine, the second panel also includes up-and-coming and major designers, focusing on architecture and design policies in the Nordic countries and the knowledge acquired in carrying out those policies.

Panelists:
Christian Scherfig, CEO of the Danish Design Centre
Sanna-Mari Jäntti, Development Director, World Design Capital Helsinki 2012
Halla Helgadóttir, Managing Director of the Iceland Design Centre
Lavrans Løvlie is a co-founder of London-based service design agency live|work.
Robin Edman, SVID, The Swedish Industrial Design Foundation, Sweden

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Susan Sontag Foundation Translation Prize Seminar

Friday, November 12, 3:30 – 4:30 pm, 5 – 6 pm & 8:30 pm

Susan Sontag Foundation Translation Prize SeminarThe 2010 Susan Sontag Prize for Translation was awarded to Benjamin Mier-Cruz, a Ph.D. candidate in Scandinavian Languages and Literatures at UC Berkeley, for his proposed translation of selected letters and poems by the Finland-Swedish author Elmer Diktonius (1896 -1961). In celebration of the translation prize, programs will include the panel discussions The Challenges of Literary Translation Today and Elmer Diktonius, Finland-Swedish Literature, and Modernism in Scandinavia. Programs will also include a screening of the rare Sontag film Duet for Cannibals/Duett för kannibaler (Sweden, 1969).

Benjamin Mier-Cruz is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Scandinavian Languages and Literatures at UC Berkeley. He received his B.A. in German Language and Literature from Arizona State University and completed his M.A. at UC Berkeley. Mier-Cruz studies 19th- and 20th-century Swedish literature with a particular interest in Finland-Swedish modernism and German expressionist poetry. He is fluent in German and Swedish and has studied in Berlin and Uppsala. Mier-Cruz became interested in Elmer Diktonius after lengthy study of Diktonius’ literary colleague Edith Södergran.

Elmer Diktonius’ letters to prominent European authors and literary critics are rich and vibrant documentation of Finland’s evolving Swedish language literature. The letters originate during the Finnish Civil War in 1918, when Diktonius was just 22 years old, and conclude with his final correspondences in 1951. The exchanges reveal the private conflicts and travels of a vanguardist of literary expressionism. In the true spirit of modernism, Diktonius sought a new literature that reconciled antiquated art forms with the psyche of a changing Europe; one that represented and provoked revolt against political and economic establishments. The letters give insight into the literary climate that lay behind the radical yet finely tuned poetry that is also included in this translation.

Elmer Diktonius (1896 – 1961) was a Finland-Swedish avant-garde poet who helped to arouse modernism in Scandinavian literature. Diktonius introduced unique representations of social, political, and cultural change with an innovative style that borrowed elements of Finnish in his Swedish verse.

Born in Helsinki, Diktonius, also a composer and fluent in Finnish, fervently sought to abandon the rigid structures of traditional rhythm in verse. He promoted literary expressionism in Finland by giving voice to man’s internal consciousness and social unrest as it came into modernity and confronted new technology. Diktonius’ poetry demonstrates his visionary aspirations for literature, the working-class, and the fate of his native Finland. His swaying political views can be seen throughout his writing, which ended in 1951.

Special thanks to the Consulate General of Sweden, New York; the Consulate General of Finland, New York; and Jacob Perlin, BAMcinématek.

The Challenges of Literary Translation Today

3:30 – 4:30 pm
FREE

Panelists include:
Benjamin Mier-Cruz, David Rieff, Judith Thurman, Susan Bernofsky, and Chad Post

Elmer Diktonius, Finland-Swedish Literature, and Modernism in Scandinavia

5 – 6 pm
FREE

Panelists include:
Benjamin Mier-Cruz and Agneta Rahikainen

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The Lapp King’s Daughter
Book Talk with Stina Katchadourian

Tuesday, November 16, 6:30 pm
FREE

The Lapp King’s Daughter-Book Talk with Stina KatchadourianFrom 1939 to 1945, Finland fought three wars: the Winter War of 1939, when the Soviet Union attacked the country; the Continuation War, when Finland fought the Soviet Union alongside Germany; and the Lapland War of 1944-45 against Germany.

Stina Katchadourian's memoir, The Lapp King's Daughter, tells the story of how these three wars uprooted the lives of one Finnish family. The book draws on the author's childhood memories and also on the correspondence between her parents, who were separated during most of World War II, with the father on the front, fighting the Soviets.

The Lapp King’s Daughter-Book Talk with Stina KatchadourianIn 1944, the mother took her two daughters from their home in Helsinki and moved them to the presumed safety of a farm in Finnish Lapland. A pawn in the power play between Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia, Finland had allied itself with Germany, hoping to stave off a Russian occupation. But in the summer of 1944, Finland could no longer fight, and so concluded a separate ceasefire with the Soviets. The peace conditions were harsh. No one knew what the Red Army would do next.

Things did get worse. Strongly urged by the Russians, the Finns attacked the Germans in Lapland. This conflict was preceded by a mass evacuation of the population of Finnish Lapland (100,000 people and their livestock), as the retreating Germans, using the scorched-earth tactic, burned down all of Finnish Lapland.

Sixty years later, after both her parents had passed away, Stina Katchadourian read their wartime correspondence for the first time, while she was a resident at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire. Through those carefully saved and chronologically bundled letters emerges a little girl who, sheltered by her parents' love, never realized how close to the brink she and her country had come.

Finland’s dramatic political history during World War II and how this small country retained its independence despite facing occupation by the Soviet Union or domination by Nazi Germany is told in riveting detail in this eyewitness account, which also includes family photos, maps, historical photos and other unique material from Swedish and Finnish archives.

Co-presented in collaboration with the Finlandia Foundation.

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Multicultural and Multilingual Identities in Contemporary Sweden
By ASF Visiting Lecturer Dr. Gunlög Sundberg

Monday, November 22, 6:30 pm
FREE

Multicultural and Multilingual Identities in Contemporary Sweden-By ASF Visiting Lecturer Dr. Gunlög Sundberg Sweden today is a multicultural society. ASF Visiting Lecturer Dr. Gunlög Sundberg will discuss individuals of different identities who use their multilingual or multicultural background as a resource in their professional lives in contemporary Sweden, using examples from literature, film, politics, music, education, sports, and business. Dr. Sundberg will also address new language laws and how Swedish, English, minority, and immigrant languages are used and identified in a multilingual Sweden.

Dr. Sundberg is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Scandinavian Languages, Stockholm University. She holds higher degrees from Stockholm University and Indiana University. During the fall 2010 semester, she will be an ASF Visiting Lecturer at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she will teach an advanced Swedish course and a class about contemporary multiculturalism in Sweden, as well as offering guest presentations. Dr. Sundberg will share her research on second language usage and multicultural workplace communication in Sweden. She will also participate in a weekly interdisciplinary multicultural applied linguistics seminar. Additionally, Dr. Sundberg will attend the annual Swedish Teacher’s Conference in North America, hosted by the Swedish Institute in fall 2010.

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2009

Sverre Fehn: The Pattern of Thoughts
Book Talk and Lecture by Per Olaf Fjeld

Monday, September 21, 6:30 pm
FREE

As recipient of the 1997 Pritzker Architecture Prize – the profession’s highest honor – architect Sverre Fehn received critical acclaim in his native Norway and internationally. Sverre Fehn: The Pattern of Thoughts Book Talk & Lecture by Per Olaf FjeldHis projects, often described as being instilled with a human quality, were strongly influenced by Scandinavia’s breathtaking landscape and light conditions. Sverre Fehn: The Pattern of ThoughtSverre Fehn: The Pattern of Thoughts provides an intimate glimpse into the world of this great post-war modernist architect known for his design sensibility and complex creative process. Oslo School of Architecture and Design Professor Per Olaf Fjeld presents both biography and perceptive critiques as he covers Fehn’s unique approach to architecture.

Co-presented with The Monacelli Press.

New Scandinavian Cuisine:
The Scandinavian Cookbook with Trine Hahnemann

Tuesday, September 29, 6:30 pm
FREE

The Scandinavian Cookbook

Trine HahnemannMore than a mere collection of recipes, chef and food author Trine Hahnemann’s latest book The Scandinavian Cookbook promotes fresh ideas in new Scandinavian cooking and food culture. Hahnemann lives in Denmark and has worked as a chef since the early 90s. Hahnemann will give a talk on the uniqueness of new Nordic food, the evening concludes with a question and answer session, book-signing, and reception.

http://trinahahnemann.com/en/

Co-presented with the Consulate General of Denmark, New York.

Sponsored by Arla Foods.

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Designing The Hamsun Centre:
A Lecture with the Architect Steven Holl

Monday, October 5, 6:30 pm
$10 ($8 ASF members)

Designing The Hamsun Centre: A Lecture with the Architect Steven HollThe Knut Hamsun Centre opened in Hamarøy, Norway, in August of this year to coincide with the 150th anniversary of Hamsun’s birth. Architect Steven Holl, who designed the centre, will delve into the concept behind it: “building as a body; battleground of invisible forces” and the process undertaken to actualize the building.

Influenced by Hamsun’s explorations of the intricacies of the human mind, the building was conceived as an archetypal and intensified compression of spirit in space and light, and as the realization of a Hamsun character in architectonic terms.

DesigningHamsun, Norway’s most innovative writer of the 20th century, fabricated new forms of expression in his first novel, the ground-breaking Hunger (Sult). With the publication of later novels such as Pan, Mysteries (Mysterier), Growth of the Soil (Markens Grøde), he established the foundation of a truly modern school of fiction. Hamsun’s work has been particularly inspiring to filmmakers, which is evident in the more than 17 films based on and inspired by his writings. His brilliant literary career was offset later in life by political turmoil. Hamsun's long-standing admiration for Germany made him sympathetic to the Nazi invasion of Norway in 1940, and consequently one of Norway’s most controversial figures.

http://www.stevenholl.com/project-detail.php?type=museums&id=39 http://www.arcspace.com/architects/Steven_Holl/hamsun_museum/

Co-presented by the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York.

Fresh! From Finland: Culinary Adventure

Wednesday, October 28, 7 pm
$25 ($20 ASF members)
This event is now full and is no longer accepting reservations

Fresh! From Finland: Culinary AdventureA relatively unknown culinary destination, Finland is living a remarkable food renaissance. Numerous Finnish restaurants are utilizing fresh local produce, Fresh! From Filand: Culinary Adventureattracting both Michelin Stars and praise from international press. Finnish cuisine is a delicate mixture of East and West - Scandinavian cooking spiced up with some Russian influence. Ingredients harvested from the clean waters and abundant forests of Finland serve both as the inspiration and as the raw material for kitchen. Fresh! From Finland: Culinary AdventureScandinavia House is celebrating Finnish culinary culture in October by bringing the fresh flavors of Finnish cuisine to New York. Some of the best chefs of Finland are spicing up the menus of Smörgås Chef Restaurant @ Scandinavia House for a week with exciting Finnish dishes. The Shop @ Scandinavia House will feature a special Fresh! From Finland section with Finnish food products, Fresh From Finland: Culinary Adventurecooking books and other dining related items.

This one night special food demonstration and tasting event offers the possibility to familiarize yourself with delicious and surprising flavors of Finland from the Southern archipelagos to the Arctic North. Chefs from Finland demonstrate various cooking techniques with a reception featuring a sampling of Finnish delicacies to follow.

Special Menu for Finnish Food Week @ Smörgås Chef Restaurant @ Scandinavia House:
Cream of sunchoke with King crabs legs
Lamb rack with rosemary and lemon sauce
Sea buckthorn with vanilla flavored skyr

Fresh! from Finland is produced by the Consulate General of Finland in New York with the support of Benecol, Finland Cheese, Iittala and Visit Finland.

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Eero Saarinen: Form-Giver at Mid-Century - A Lecture by Architect Der Scutt

Wednesday, November 11, 2009, 6.30 pm, $15 ($10 ASF, ASS and Finlandia Foundation members)

Eero Saarinen: Form-Giver at Mid-Century - A Lecture by Architect Der ScuttPresented at the Museum of the City of New York from November 10, 2009 through January 31, 2010, Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future is the first retrospective of this architect’s career, which was one of the most prolific, unorthodox, and controversial in the history of 20th-century architecture. From the TWA Terminal at JFK Airport and the St. Louis Gateway Arch to the Pedestal Chair for Knoll Associates, Saarinen (1910-1961) created some of the most potent expressions of American identity after World War II. Saarinen’s clients constituted a who’s who of the era’s most prominent industries and institutions. For them he designed buildings that advanced the expansion of higher education to the promotion of automobile culture and air travel, popular forms of entertainment like television, and the newest information technologies. Featuring sketches, working drawings, models, photographs, furnishings, films, and other ephemera, the exhibition examines the architect’s career from the 1930s through the early 1960s.

Eero Saarinen: Form-Giver at Mid-Century - A Lecture by Architect Der ScuttTo celebrate this exhibition Finlandia Foundation New York Metropolitan Chapter and the American-Scandinavian Society have organized an evening at Scandinavian House: The Nordic Center in America in honor of Eero Saarinen. Der Scutt, FAIA Architect, will tell us more about Saarinen in words and pictures. We will have a chance to meet and greet with Susan Saarinen, Eero Saarinen’s daughter, as she is our guest of honor at this event.

A reception to follow the lecture.

About Der Scutt:
Der Scutt, FAIA is an internationally acclaimed, award-winning architect. His skyscrapers, including high-rise office and residential buildings, can be seen throughout Manhattan's skyline. His projects include numerous corporate headquarters, museums, research laboratories, and residences.

Eero Saarinen: Form-Giver at Mid-Century - A Lecture by Architect Der ScuttScutt was in New Haven during Saarinen's relocation and was thus able to witness firsthand the construction of some of Saarinen's notable achievements. He visited most of the projects illustrated in the talk.

Both Saarinen and Scutt (first in his class) were honor graduates of Yale University School of Architecture. Yale produced many of the most famous architects practicing today.

Scutt became close friends with Aline Saarinen, Eero's second wife and consequently was able to visit with Saarinen on several occasions. Growing up with and travelling through Saarinen’s projects gave Scutt a unique position in discussing this great architect's work.

Der Scutt works and lives in New York with his Finnish wife, Leena Scutt of Mikkeli, Finland.

Info:
Reservations must be made by November 9, 2009 with payment and checks made payable to American Scandinavian Society. For more information please call Leena Scutt 212.744.0813 or email information@finlandiafoundationny.org

Related event:
Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future
Museum of the City of New York
November 10, 2009 – January 31, 2010
More information at the following links:
http://www.mcny.org/exhibitions/future/eero-saarinen.html
http://www.eerosaarinen.net/project.shtml

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Energy and Architecture: How Green is Green?

Monday, November 16, 6:30 pm
$10 ($8 ASF members)

Energy and Architecture: How Green is Green?A panel discussion including American and Danish architects will analyze the benefits, compromises, and challenges in creating and designing sustainable buildings and communities in the U.S. and Denmark. Energy and Architecture: How Green is Green?The panel, which includes architects Stephen Kieran of the well-known Philadelphia firm Kieran Timberlake and Bjarke Ingels, head of the architectural practice Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), will explore the differences and similarities in the energy-saving measures used by architects in each country. Since the U.S. and Denmark vary greatly in size, climatic conditions, and commonly-used building materials and energy-saving features, the discussion will examine how each country can learn from the other. The moderator of the discussion is Suzanne Stephens, deputy editor of Architectural Record.

Co-Presented with Architectural Record and the Consulate General of Denmark, New York.

 Low Carbon GrowthLow Carbon Growth?
Perspectives for the UN Conference on Climate Change

Monday, November 23, 6 – 8 pm
$50
Advance reservations are required. Please call 212.847.9740

The five Nordic-American Chambers of Commerce and The American-Scandinavian Foundation join together to host this United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP 15, event where the panel will consist of the five Nordic Ambassadors to the UN, H.E. Carsten Staur (Denmark), H.E. Jarmo Viinanen (Finland), H.E. Dr. Gunnar Pálsson (Iceland), H.E. Morten Wetland (Norway), and H.E. Anders A. Lidén (Sweden), who will discuss the upcoming conference in Copenhagen, December 7th through 18th. A reception will follow.

Co-presented in collaboration with the five Nordic American Chambers of Commerce of New York.

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