Concerts past

Jaerv & Thinguma*jigSaw

Tue—4-13-2010
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Photo Courtesy of ensemble mise-en

TUE – 4-13-2010 – 7:00 PM
$15 ($10 ASF Members)

Scandinavian folk music today isn’t what it once was. With urbanization and modern innovations such as TV, radio, records, and CDs, traditional music faded in the 20th century. The folk music scene has reemerged and today is revitalized and diverse, splitting roughly into two areas: acoustic and electric, with experimentation of varying degrees happening at both ends of the spectrum. Occasionally avant-garde, but consistently accessible, one can still hear the traditional Nordic folk styles woven into the richly-textured musical tapestries of these innovative musicians.

Jaerv is a Swedish quintet, playing extroverted, vigorous, and heartfelt folk music with influences from both jazz and pop music. Together, the five members have created a homogeneous, vivid sound that has, over a short period of time, established the group on the folk music scene as well as in many other forums. Rooted in several different musical traditions, Jaerv offers a varied stage performance where vocal, five-voiced tunes blend in with energetic dances and free improvisations. Their concerts have been broadcast, both on Swedish national radio and abroad and the band has toured extensively over the last three years.

Jaerv and Thinguma*jigSawThinguma*jigSaw is a Norwegian duo playing what they call “splatter-folk” on banjo, musical saw, flute, melodica, and vocals. Their music is influenced by British folk, Appalachian ballads, art/cult/horror-films, and the literary musings of Samuel Beckett, Edgar Allan Poe and James Joyce. Thinguma*jigSaw has existed for two years, released their album (awakeinwhitechapel) on the Irish cred-label Deserted Village, and has toured extensively in Europe and the U.S., doing gigs together with the Tiger Lillies, Meg Baird, Samara Lubelski and Castanets, among others. Thinguma*jigSaw has rapidly become a highly beloved live-phenomenon, stunning audiences wherever they play: Time Out London ranked them as one of 2008’s live highlights, next to Bon Iver, and New York Post described their live-performance as “deeply unsettling, yet strangely comforting.”